Have you ever opened your laptop?
Poll has expired, here are the final results
Hot Deal

Laptop Buying and Maintenance Guide (Windows)

1393°
  • 3777
  • 69
  • Last Comment
  • Reasons

    Vote down Reasons

    • Self Promotion : 2
    • Invalid/User Specific Coupon/Deal : 1
Hunk
bikidas2060

https://www.intel.in/content/www/in/en/products...
If you have a doubt about what kind of laptop to buy then consider this.

  • Normal Laptop If usage is limited to web surfing, watching movies, casual audio/video editing, document and spreadsheet works.
  • Gaming Laptop If you play games, edit videos frequently, work on demanding apps.
  • Thin and Light Laptops If you travel often.
  • Ultrabooks If you work on the go. 🙂
    Gaming laptops weigh a lot. The power brick adds extra weight. The battery life is less. Heavy duty components generate more heat. Bulkier heat management systems are required. A normal laptop will have light weight energy efficient components. So, technically a normal laptop should last longer than a gaming laptop. And gaming laptops demand more maintenance which we will discuss later. Ultrabooks are great but they come with either soldered memory/storage or both. So, upgrading ultrabooks will not be possible all the time. If you are buying Ultrabooks check for Intel Evo certification (https://www.intel.in/content/www/in/en/products...)

Buying Guide

  • Display Use flicker free (PWM free) displays. Prefer IPS panel. For outdoor visibility min 300 nits is required. OLEDs often use PWM to control brightness. I have sensitive eyes. I get headaches from it. 🙂 Majority of people go fine with displays with PWM control. IPS/OLED (Multimedia Work), TN (Low end laptops have it. Rough n tough laptops might have em). Aspect ratio is another overlooked term. 16:9 (1.77), 16:10 (1.6), 3:2 (1.5) are typical ratios are found. It is calculated by Length/ Breadth of laptop’s display. In 16:9 panels Length>> Breadth and in 3:2 panel Length > Breadth. For multimedia watching 16:9/16:10 work great. For coding/ working on large set of data 3:2 is the best. You get to read more lines and you get more workable vertical screen real estate. 4K/2K are battery hogging things.
  • RAM Take min 16GB of RAM. It will be really great if you choose Laptops with upgradable RAM. DDR5 is making debut. I think 3200MHz is the new norm in the Laptop world.
  • Storage An SSD is faster and more expensive than a traditional HDD. If combo drives are available such as 256GB SSD + 1TB HDD then it is absolutely fine. Choose SSD over HDD. NVMe > SATA III in terms of speed. Dell confuses people with Class 35 and 40. Refer this https://community.spiceworks.com/topic/1529476-.... Class 40 means NVMe. That’s it. SLC>MLC>TLC>QLC. In consumer market we will get to choose between TLC and QLC. Take TLC. M.2 SSDs come at 2280/2260/2240/2242 shapes. Last two digits represents length. Take the lengthier one among the available options. 🙂 (Lenovo allows that thing) Read in details here https://www.faceofit.com/m-2-2280-vs-m-2...2/, OPAL storage specs give you extra data security https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opal_Storage_Spec...
  • Processor
  • CPU Which processor to buy? H versions will demand more power than their U counterparts. So, you have to make a bargain. H version (Gaming, video editing, photo editing, suitable for apps requiring more resources, lesser battery life in comparison to U ones), U version (Daily mundane tasks, web surfing, light photo editing, working on office suits, more battery life). Intel’s processor codes are as followed. i9>i7>i5>i3>pentium/celeron (in terms of performance). Let’s take an example Core i7 1165G7 of https://www.amazon.in/HP-Pavilion-13-3-inch-Cer... Core i7(Brand Name) 11(Generation Indicator) 65(SKU numeric digit) G7. Suffix codes G1-G7 Graphics level (processors with new integrated graphics technology only), E Embedded, F Requires discrete graphics, G Includes discrete graphics on package, H High performance optimized for mobile, HK High performance optimized for mobile n unlocked, HQ High performance optimized for mobile n quad core, U Mobile power efficient. Source: https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/process... AMD scheme https://www.drtechtips.com/amd-ryzen-cpu-names-... Which one to buy? Don’t make a fuss. Most of us won’t be using full power of the laptop. If you are paying a premium for your laptop, then ensure you get the top notch hardware. U (For travel, basic usage, battery conservation), H (Gaming and demanding stuff). 12th Gen Intel processors are really great. 🙂 Very nice article on choosing a Laptop CPU https://in.pcmag.com/processors/141673/how-to-c...
  • GPU Integrated GPUs will give you better battery life than dedicated ones. AMD’s Vega series used to work better than its Intel counterparts. Intel’s Iris Xe is doing really well these days. Discreet graphics are great for gaming and video editing. Nvidia’s GTX1650 should do basic gaming, video editing. RTX 2060/3060/3070/3080 should do demanding gameplays n GPU accelerated Data Science Stuff easier. GTX 1660 TI is a nice intermediate between the two extremes. MX450s/MX350s come with thin laptops. Check this comparisons https://www.notebookcheck.net/Iris-Xe-G7-96EUs-... MAX Q vs Normal ones https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/max-q-defi...).
  • Battery More watt hours means a bigger battery and a bigger battery means more space occupied.
    https://cdn0.desidime.com/attachments/photos/711766/medium/7931141csm_Dell_Insp5310_28_3169bfbe34.jpg?1631714054
    Source: https://www.notebookcheck.net/Dell-Inspiron-13-...
    That means you can’t add a mechanical SSD.
    https://cdn0.desidime.com/attachments/photos/711767/medium/7931141WpV3ySM.jpg?1631714061
    Check mine. 🐒🐒 56 Wh battery. But it has space for mechanical HDD.
    See, you are making a tradeoff. Better battery life means you need to depend upon SSD. SSDs are costly so you should expect to spend more money. 🙂
  • Chassis Metal vs Plastic. Best laptops come in both metal and plastic bodies. So, it’s okay. I choose plastic over metal chassis. 🙂
  • Touchpad Bigger one means better. Textured one means better. But nothing works well as compared to Macbook touchpad. 🙂
  • Where to buy and which brand to buy Where ever you get the best deals. If you want a customized laptop then Dell(Only Latitude and Precision laptops https://www.dell.com/en-in/work/shop/business-l..., https://www.dell.com/en-in/work/shop/business-l...) , Lenovo (https://www.lenovo.com/in/en/d/customise-to-ord...) and Azom(https://az...o/) allow you to do the same in India. I am really really really pissed at Dell and HP laptops. Take an example of HP probook 635 aero https://www.hp.com/in-en/shop/laptops-tablets/h.... It costs 88k. But it gives subpar display. HP and Dell ain’t got no soul. They charge hefty price for everything. Best value for money and robustness is provided by Asus. Acer provides cheap things but people complain of its build and longevity. Lenovo is good for customization. Thinkpad (Lenovo), Latitude (Dell), Travelmate (Acer) are solidly built laptops. They use high quality plastic and components. They come with military grade endurance ratings. Asus Tuf and LG Gram come with military grade endurance ratings. Best things about Gram and Thinkpads are most of them come with three year standard warranty. Lenovo even offers 3 years ADP for a premium. In terms of Gaming performance MSI, Alienware(Dell), Legion(Lenovo), Rog (Asus), Predator (Acer) and HP (Omen) stand out in the crowd. Dell documents everything properly. So, in case you need some assistance then you can always download files and stuff. Asus just wipes the product history just like that. Lenovo, HP keep the documentation alive for a while. MSI’s forum is really helpful. People are very much into DIY stuff. Lenovo keeps things a bit low key. So, if you want a ton of support then buy a Dell. If you want support from forums a lot then buy a Dell. If you want good warranty offers then buy an Asus. If you want tons of good things at a budget then buy an Acer. If you want DIY things buy an MSI. MSI gives best things but support is bad in India. If you buy from online e-stores then Laptop manufacturers give better offers with Warranty and ADP. So, before buying from Amazon and Flipkart check if your product is eligible for ADP upgrades. Always choose ADP. If you buy directly from manufacturer’s website then you might get a better deal. People sometimes get better deal at Offline shops. Buy the cheapest option available if you get to choose between Online and Offline stores.

Things to do/don’ts after buying a laptop (After Receiving It)

  • Register it at its official website.
  • Avail the extra offers if you want to.
  • Buy couple of Microfiber Clothes. Wipe your display and laptop’s body with it.
  • Keep the invoice at a safe place.
  • No need of buying fancy Cooling Pads. If your laptop is a gaming laptop then it will have bigger intake vents. The cooling pads might blow debris into em. And it might cause damage. So, do yourself a favor and buy a laptop stand instead. If you want to cheap out things like me, then buy a laminated exam board. Remove the metal clips and bolts used to fasten the metal clip. Put your laptop on it. 🐒🐒 It will cost you around 65 rupees. Don’t forget to buy me some candies.
  • Keep the vents clean. Don’t apply thermal paste if your laptop uses thermal tape. Choose wisely
    https://cdn0.desidime.com/attachments/photos/711767/medium/7931141WpV3ySM.jpg?1631714061
    I opened my laptop today and I was shocked to see this. The service center guy had wantonly applied Thermal Paste on the chip which was supposed to be covered by Thermal Pad(Ride side of the large metal cover). 😣
    https://cdn0.desidime.com/attachments/photos/711768/medium/793114183EscQA.jpg?1631714071
    Happy Engineer’s Day. The Engineer in me just got awake. I opened the fans and cleaned em. Applied new Thermal Paste and wiped out the unwanted Thermal Paste. https://www.amazon.in/Thermal-Grizzly-Kryonaut-... is an amazing product. 🙂🙂🙂🤗
    https://cdn0.desidime.com/attachments/photos/711769/medium/7931141KUVFE4D.jpg?1631714078
    (Before) Source: https://imgur.com/K...4D
    https://cdn0.desidime.com/attachments/photos/711770/medium/7931141C7lyTdr.jpg?1631714081
    (After) Source: https://imgur.com/C...dr
  • Don’t use edges to open the laptop.
  • Keep a spare pendrive and make it bootable rescue drive.
  • Don’t keep food and drink near the laptop. Don’t engage in gluttony in front of your laptop.
  • Don’t drop your powerbrick. Don’t twist the wires. Manage your wires properly.
  • Use the manufacturer provided battery conservation techniques. Plug and use your laptop. If you are among them, who charge the device and use it then you are doing a wrong thing. You are just wasting your battery cycle.
  • Please check with your Laptop manufacturer if they are okay with you opening the laptop. Otherwise ask your technician. If you know what to do then do it. You should experience no problems at all other than risking voiding of the warranty.

Deal Wiki

Missed this: Update your drivers and install latest windows update. 🙂🙂🙂 Use AC supply to update your Bios. Please research well about recovering your laptop BIOS. If BIOS gets corrupted then either we can revive it by a bootable flashdrive or reflash the BIOS by taking it to appropriate service center guys.
Edit: how often thermal paste n pads should be changed. By @andromeda
A little intro:

Two different surfaces when placed together will never match evenly. There will always be gaps in between them.

Thermal paste between the CPU and Heat sink creates an even surface and covers 100% of the surface area of the CPU. This allows the heat to transfer from the CPU to the Heat sink, keeping the CPU cooler and at a nominal operating temperature.

Now recent designs mandate thermal pads because there is a decent gap between the heat sink and CPU. Only pads can fill in such huge gap. If they are close to each other, thermal paste will suffice. I usually use thermal paste betwen the CPU & thermal pad, thermal pad & heat sink.

Not using thermal paste between the CPU and the heat sink will cause it to eventually overheat and fail. This may not happen straight away but it will happen and in a much shorter time than if you use the thermal paste.

How frequent should they be changed?
There is no such rules IMO. Below are a few I follow.

If you happen to detach the heat sink for any reason, replace them with new as old thermal pads are under screw mounting, they may not cover the gaps as earlier once repositioned. I once replaced a motherboard on my friend’s laptop. The old thermal pads are in good condition, but I went with new part as I don’t want to reuse even slightly delated pads. The other reason being I anyway have spare, what good use they serve if we don’t put them to use.
If they look punctured or dried up, they definately need to be changed
I don’t usually remove the interface if it is normal dusting/cleaning. I blow the dust away, clean with alcoholic wipe or IPA and be done with it. If it still behaves like heat engine, I will then look at thermal pad part.
If the laptop uses only heat sink compound (paste) I’ll remove it, clean, and reapply another fresh layer even if I do normal cleaning. Heat sink compound comparatively hardens much faster than pads, and when hardened it kind of becomes insulator preventing heat to transfer

Edit: be careful about user reviews regarding hinge issues. By @ULYSSES

68 Comments  |  
30 Dimers
  • Sort By
Hunk Hunk
Link Copied
pvv460326 wrote:

You forgot to mention generations of processors
The most important thing in choosing laptop
For example in budget ryzen 3 5300u is better than ryzen 5 3500u or even 4500u( because it comes with better ram speed,better ssd and some other)
Ryzen 5600u,5800u(zen 3)are lot better than 5500u 5700u(zen2) because they are later generation
All intel laptops below 11th gen are not at all worth spending (because 11th gen comes with ~20% single core boost over 10th gen)

Actually I had attached a link about AMD. Thanks for your input. 🙂

Deal Lieutenant Deal Lieutenant
Link Copied

…@bikidas2060 ….hats off bro…such a detailed thread….

Hunk Hunk
Link Copied
still_guessing wrote:

…@bikidas2060 ….hats off bro…such a detailed thread….

Thank you sooo much. 🙂🙂🙂 Yesterday I had opened my laptop. After opening the fans I wanted to take a pic. 😂 Then I thought of making an article on it.

Deal Subedar Deal Subedar
Link Copied
Expand
bikidas2060 wrote:

Thank you sooo much. 🙂🙂🙂 Yesterday I had opened my laptop. After opening the fans I wanted to take a pic. 😂 Then I thought of making an article on it.

Bhai any workaround to remove some dust particles that unfortunately got inside my lapi screen ?? pensive

Analyst Analyst
Link Copied
Expand
bikidas2060 wrote:

Dust particles in lapi screen.🥺🥺😔 That needs specialized knowledge. @guest_999 @andromeda

Does the screen has digitizer?

In any case, the dust need to be removed, or live with it.
I don’t know how much a diy you are into, but it needs good amount of attention depending on complexity.

Use a clean microfiber cloth to remove the dust. Do not use any sort of cleaning liquids unless the dust is something that is hard to remove. Finally, the suggestions/opinions/ideas may change when I see the problem with my eyes.

@jennyllwilliams

Critic Critic
Link Copied
Expand
jennyllwilliams wrote:
pensive pensive

How old is the laptop, if more than 4-5 years old then better go for new one. If not then see if you can tolerate it till you get a new one. If you really need to replace screen then contact local laptop repair shops as it may cost less than 5k depending on your bargaining skills.

Analyst Analyst
Moderator
Link Copied

If you want to cheap out things like me, then buy a laminated exam board. Remove the metal clips and bolts used to fasten the metal clip. Put your laptop on it. stuck_out_tongue

Deal Subedar Deal Subedar
Link Copied
Expand
guest_999 wrote:

How old is the laptop, if more than 4-5 years old then better go for new one. If not then see if you can tolerate it till you get a new one. If you really need to replace screen then contact local laptop repair shops as it may cost less than 5k depending on your bargaining skills.

Can’t go for new one currently.

Please tell some basic screen care tips to prevent dust particles further from entering inside screen.

cc: @bikidas2060

Analyst Analyst
Link Copied
Expand
jennyllwilliams wrote:

Can’t go for new one currently.

Please tell some basic screen care tips to prevent dust particles further from entering inside screen.

cc: @bikidas2060

Please don’t get me wrong.

The answers you seek are very specific but the questions are very generic. How about giving us some context like the laptop make/model, pictures of the issue as you see it, and other living conditions?

The dust you see could be a dead pixel, did you eliminate that part?

If you want the answer to the above question, you need to seal the laptop screen edges wherever there is a chance to open it. And this sealing is again broad in nature. One advise won’t fit all kind of problems. There is another solution; to live (to use laptop) in dust free environment

Hunk Hunk
Link Copied
Expand
jennyllwilliams wrote:

Can’t go for new one currently.

Please tell some basic screen care tips to prevent dust particles further from entering inside screen.

cc: @bikidas2060

Bhai, please check the surrounding plastic cover. If possible then remove the plastic cover then reapply the plastic cover around the display. Then use a microfiber cloth to wipe the display daily. 🙂🙂🙂 That’s it. Dust the laptop compartment regularly.

Deal Subedar Deal Subedar
Link Copied
Expand
bikidas2060 wrote:

Bhai, please check the surrounding plastic cover. If possible then remove the plastic cover then reapply the plastic cover around the display. Then use a microfiber cloth to wipe the display daily. 🙂🙂🙂 That’s it. Dust the laptop compartment regularly.

@andromeda HP Pavilion G4 1303AU is the model.

@bikidas2060 bhai how to clean the screen if it has dust spot on it. Wet plain clothes or something specific.
??

Analyst Analyst
Link Copied
Expand
jennyllwilliams wrote:

@andromeda HP Pavilion G4 1303AU is the model.

@bikidas2060 bhai how to clean the screen if it has dust spot on it. Wet plain clothes or something specific.
??

I suppose your laptop will look similar. The video mostly covers the overall removal/replacement of the screen, but the dust you are talking about will mostly be inside the display panel.

The below video shows different parts of a panel.

And most display panels I’ve seen are very securely packed with proper guard and decent amount of binding tape etc. Chances of dust entering is quite possible, but rare.

The instance at 3rd minute is what you need to access to clean the dust you are mentioning. But it is complicated even for most DIY folks, for the reason that they will end up leaving smudges in other parts of the screen while assembling, and not to mention it needs to be done in a relatively dust free environment. There are also good chances to mess up the other electronics alongside.

So suggestion is to live with it if it is confirmed speck of dust.

Some alternate suggestions is to use a dark themed wall paper to avoid seeing the dust.

Deal Cadet Deal Cadet
Link Copied
Par_ wrote:

Anyone who planning to buy Dell G3, It has problem in hinge design. . You can find issue in google and youtube and even at Dell community website.
https://www.dell.com/community/Inspiron/G3-15-3...
https://cdn0.desidime.com/attachments/photos/711778/medium/7931193photo-2020-06-27-10-22-37.jpg?1631715621

Same hinge problem with Dell Inspiron 15. Dont buy dell.

I am sure if a laptop could be upgrade: SSD, ram it also costs more upfront

Hunk Hunk
Link Copied
Expand
sppaVt wrote:

Same hinge problem with Dell Inspiron 15. Dont buy dell.

I am sure if a laptop could be upgrade: SSD, ram it also costs more upfront

Not necessarily bhai. Ultrabooks cost like crazy yet come with extremely limited upgradable parts. 🙂

Deal Subedar Deal Subedar
Link Copied
Expand
sppaVt wrote:

Same hinge problem with Dell Inspiron 15. Dont buy dell.

I am sure if a laptop could be upgrade: SSD, ram it also costs more upfront

Hinge issues have become quite common with many brands now. Results of using flimsy materials to reduce weight, size and cost. More often they don’t happen with high end models as they already charge heavily.
I used my 2011 dell xps very roughly and still nothing happened till now. My friend’s dell mid range laptop hinge broke within a year of very safe use. My brother has 2014 dell inspiron 3542 which has extremely flimsy build quality (could hear creaking noises every time I open lid), luckily hinge is still intact.
Friend fought with offline lenovo customer care to get a replacement instead of refurbished parts as motherboard had issues within few days. Finally he got new lap after 6 months and it’s hinge broke after warranty. My father has lenovo G50-80 which costed just 25k whose build is much better than my brother’s dell which costed 57k.
My msi GL63 series laptop hinge broke last year with just moderate use. I didn’t even notice when it broke until my father pointed out. Found some hard glues online specially for such laptop issues but  fevikwik+fevicol+tape solved my issue as of now.

Analyst Analyst
Link Copied
bikidas2060 wrote:

Guys. I have a genuine question. I got to know of Thermal Grizzly Carbonaut 38 × 38 × 0.2 mm https://www.amazon.in/dp/B07PHLJYWK/ref=cm_sw_r...
Is it good? @andromeda @guest_999 @soyoozms
And how frequent the thermal pads have to be changed???? 🙂🙂🙂🙃

A little intro:

Two different surfaces when placed together will never match evenly. There will always be gaps in between them.

Thermal paste between the CPU and Heat sink creates an even surface and covers 100% of the surface area of the CPU. This allows the heat to transfer from the CPU to the Heat sink, keeping the CPU cooler and at a nominal operating temperature.

Now recent designs mandate thermal pads because there is a decent gap between the heat sink and CPU. Only pads can fill in such huge gap. If they are close to each other, thermal paste will suffice. I usually use thermal paste betwen the CPU & thermal pad, thermal pad & heat sink.

Not using thermal paste between the CPU and the heat sink will cause it to eventually overheat and fail. This may not happen straight away but it will happen and in a much shorter time than if you use the thermal paste.

How frequent should they be changed?
There is no such rules IMO. Below are a few I follow.

  • If you happen to detach the heat sink for any reason, replace them with new as old thermal pads are under screw mounting, they may not cover the gaps as earlier once repositioned. I once replaced a motherboard on my friend’s laptop. The old thermal pads are in good condition, but I went with new part as I don’t want to reuse even slightly delated pads. The other reason being I anyway have spare, what good use they serve if we don’t put them to use.
  • If they look punctured or dried up, they definately need to be changed
  • I don’t usually remove the interface if it is normal dusting/cleaning. I blow the dust away, clean with alcoholic wipe or IPA and be done with it. If it still behaves like heat engine, I will then look at thermal pad part.
  • If the laptop uses only heat sink compound (paste) I’ll remove it, clean, and reapply another fresh layer even if I do normal cleaning. Heat sink compound comparatively hardens much faster than pads, and when hardened it kind of becomes insulator preventing heat to transfer
Hunk Hunk
Link Copied
Expand
andromeda wrote:

A little intro:

Two different surfaces when placed together will never match evenly. There will always be gaps in between them.

Thermal paste between the CPU and Heat sink creates an even surface and covers 100% of the surface area of the CPU. This allows the heat to transfer from the CPU to the Heat sink, keeping the CPU cooler and at a nominal operating temperature.

Now recent designs mandate thermal pads because there is a decent gap between the heat sink and CPU. Only pads can fill in such huge gap. If they are close to each other, thermal paste will suffice. I usually use thermal paste betwen the CPU & thermal pad, thermal pad & heat sink.

Not using thermal paste between the CPU and the heat sink will cause it to eventually overheat and fail. This may not happen straight away but it will happen and in a much shorter time than if you use the thermal paste.

How frequent should they be changed?
There is no such rules IMO. Below are a few I follow.

  • If you happen to detach the heat sink for any reason, replace them with new as old thermal pads are under screw mounting, they may not cover the gaps as earlier once repositioned. I once replaced a motherboard on my friend’s laptop. The old thermal pads are in good condition, but I went with new part as I don’t want to reuse even slightly delated pads. The other reason being I anyway have spare, what good use they serve if we don’t put them to use.
  • If they look punctured or dried up, they definately need to be changed
  • I don’t usually remove the interface if it is normal dusting/cleaning. I blow the dust away, clean with alcoholic wipe or IPA and be done with it. If it still behaves like heat engine, I will then look at thermal pad part.
  • If the laptop uses only heat sink compound (paste) I’ll remove it, clean, and reapply another fresh layer even if I do normal cleaning. Heat sink compound comparatively hardens much faster than pads, and when hardened it kind of becomes insulator preventing heat to transfer

Nice bhai. Thank you for this update. 🙂

Critic Critic
Link Copied
bikidas2060 wrote:

Guys. I have a genuine question. I got to know of Thermal Grizzly Carbonaut 38 × 38 × 0.2 mm https://www.amazon.in/dp/B07PHLJYWK/ref=cm_sw_r...
Is it good? @andromeda @guest_999 @soyoozms
And how frequent the thermal pads have to be changed???? 🙂🙂🙂🙃

Bhai watch this full video:

Give attention to conductive vs non-conductive nature for thermal pastes & pads.
@andromeda

Missing