*10 Best Tips for A Morning Routine Makeover*

*10 Best Tips for A Morning Routine Makeover*

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Productivity Experts Share Their

“10 Best Tips for A Morning Routine Makeover*

There is no one-size-fits-all solution to getting the most out of the first hours of the day, so we found 10 solutions to choose from.

“The first hour of the morning is the rudder of the day,” said 19th-century social reformer Henry Ward Beecher, and a couple of centuries later, the sentiment still holds true. A great morning can set the tone for a great day, while a bad morning can make us want to give up and go back to bed. So how do you have more great starts than bad beginnings?

Unfortunately, there isn’t a one-size-fits-all approach, says Ryan Nicodemus, coauthor of Minimalism: Live a Meaningful Life. “That’s why finding a routine is so difficult; there isn’t a template, and everyone’s morning is going to look different,” he says. “You have to find what’s right for you.”

To design your best morning, take a look at these 10 tips from productivity experts:

1. REMIND YOURSELF WHY YOU’RE DOING IT

While you might intellectually understand that it’s beneficial to get ready for the day, that alone won’t motivate you to do anything, says Nicodemus.

“You have to understand why you’re doing something,” he says. Write down what you want to accomplish each morning and list all of the reasons why. If you find yourself getting derailed, take out your list and review your aspirations. “Looking at your list can help you understand your priorities, and you’ll feel worse if you get off track than if you didn’t have your list.”

2. START THE NIGHT BEFORE

The best morning routines start out the night before, says John Trosko, founder of the California-based organizing firm Organizing LA.

“Lay your clothes out the night before, pack lunches, and even plan dinner,” he says. “Make sure your laptop or bag is packed, so you don’t have to think about what you need in the morning. Your day can get off to a great start if you’ve planned out your start.”

3. GET UP EARLIER

Mornings often feel hectic because you run short on time. While it seems a no-brainer, getting up 15 minutes early can eliminate the feeling of being rushed, says Lorie Marrero, author of The Home Office Handbook: Rules of Thumb for Organizing Your Time, Information, and Workspace.

Use a timer to find out how long each step of your routine takes. Our brains are notoriously bad at estimating elapsed time.

“The morning is one of the best places to find extra time,” she says. “Getting up 30 minutes early means you can meditate or read, and giving yourself an extra hour means a workout.”

4. CHANGE YOUR PHYSICAL STATE

If you’re not a morning person, it can be hard to jump-start your morning routine. In order to transition into a productive mode, Nicodemus says you have to change your state.

“Jump into a cold shower; it will change your state immediately,” he says, adding that coffee works, as does refusing to use the snooze button. “If you’re setting your alarm 30 to 45 minutes early so you can hit the snooze button a few times, you’ll end up being more tired than if you got up when your alarm went off.”

5. TIME YOUR ROUTINE

Find out how long things really take by timing your morning routine, and then plan accordingly.

“You might think you can take a shower, brush your teeth, get dressed and take care of other grooming needs in five minutes, but you can’t,” says Lisa Zaslow, founder of the organizing firm Gotham Organizers. “Use a timer to find out how long each step of your routine takes, then determine what time you need to get up based on that. Our brains are notoriously bad at estimating elapsed time.”

6. PUT OFF YOUR DISTRACTIONS

The biggest problem when it comes to a morning routine is distractions, says Nicodemus.

“What happens is that checking email, social media, the news, and our stocks feels like productivity,” he says. “But we’re really just distracting ourselves from what needs to be done first. Don’t allow yourself to do any of those tasks until you’ve finished your morning routine.”

7. ELIMINATE CHOICES

Wear the same clothes and eat the same breakfast, suggests Carson Tate, author of Work Simply.

“Boring? Yes, at times. However, the goal is to minimize decision making and move through your morning routine with the least amount of mental output as possible,” she says. “The fewer decisions you have to make in the morning, the less fatigued your prefrontal cortex becomes, freeing you up to focus on strategic, revenue-producing ideas and projects. Eliminating choices is a powerful productivity hack.”

For example, Tate has two pairs of the exact same black pants and buys the same style of dress in different colors. “I can open my closet and get dressed on autopilot,” she says.

8. SET YOUR PRIORITIES FOR THE DAY
Carve out a little time to review your calendar and identify what you need to do, says Janine Adams, founder of the professional organizing firm Peace of Mind. “That can happen with coffee or breakfast, on the train to work, or anywhere else you can focus,” she says. “Knowing the top three things that you need to accomplish in a day gives you extra focus and helps you stay on task when you arrive at the office.”

9. SET A GOAL

Trosko has a client who challenges herself to do things that will start off the day well: “She and her husband give themselves a star for a variety of good behavior, like getting up early, going for a walk, sex, meditation, making a smoothie, Pilates, or writing,” he says. “They add up their number each morning with a goal to get to five stars.”

10. TAKE ADVANTAGE OF PUBLIC TRANSIT
Let someone else do the driving, suggests Marrero.

“Taking the bus or train will give you time to read or work, and you might walk a couple of blocks, which is good for your body and mind,” she says. "Use an app like RideScout to help you investigate your options.

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Good one forever

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@srocks wrote:

Good one forever


While other points r excellent, I am NOT lagree with Point no 5&7.

We need some change, we r not machines.

We need 4 bottle rozka

@farzimaal

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@[email protected]_0_0_D wrote:

h2. Baby’s first time in the rain



http://imgur.com/gallery/O...oe


how can i make gif out of this ?

@Smarty

@[email protected]@[email protected]


@dipakpatel


http://i.imgur.com/O84Bg...if

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@[email protected]_0_0_D wrote:

h2. Baby’s first time in the rain



https://i.imgur.com/gallery/O...oe


how can i make gif out of this ?

@Smarty

@[email protected]@[email protected]


@dipakpatel


Better to compress it to avoid data loading

https://cdn0.desidime.com/Placeholders/No-Image-Available.png

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*Sports and Recreation :: #2357
By Mike Swindlehurst from Bournemouth United Kingdom

Ball games*

I have played Soccer, Tennis, Cricket, Squash, Badminton and the 3 most useful tips that were given to me were: -

- Put all you have into looking for a spot or other such marking on the ball until it leaves your racquet or bat ~ this prevents you taking your eye off the ball.

- It’s never over ‘til it’s over ~ no matter what the score is’ keep cool and keep up your effort ~ don’t let your shoulders drop.

- Keep your cool and don’t be tempted to try too hard, 95% of mistakes are caused by trying too hard. You must practice everyday until you are able to relax and let your body do what it wants to do.

What brought these to my attention, and were emphasized in a Bob Harman tennis book, was that I played my best tennis shots when we were knocking up, when the service was out and other such stress free moments.

@rockingstaryash

@dipakpatel

@mr.lonely

@VaibhavJain

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@[email protected]_0_0_D wrote:

*Sports and Recreation :: #2357
By Mike Swindlehurst from Bournemouth United Kingdom

Ball games*


I have played Soccer, Tennis, Cricket, Squash, Badminton and the 3 most useful tips that were given to me were: -

- Put all you have into looking for a spot or other such marking on the ball until it leaves your racquet or bat ~ this prevents you taking your eye off the ball.

- It’s never over ‘til it’s over ~ no matter what the score is’ keep cool and keep up your effort ~ don’t let your shoulders drop.

- Keep your cool and don’t be tempted to try too hard, 95% of mistakes are caused by trying too hard. You must practice everyday until you are able to relax and let your body do what it wants to do.

What brought these to my attention, and were emphasized in a Bob Harman tennis book, was that I played my best tennis shots when we were knocking up, when the service was out and other such stress free moments.

@rockingstaryash

@dipakpatel

@mr.lonely

@VaibhavJain


Ball games.Ya right .its true also with marbles (kya bolte usko in ur local languages ) Goti , Kanche https://cdn1.desidime.com/assets/textile-editor/icon_biggrin.gif

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Leisure Lifestyle by Michael Daws
It is no doubt that “selfies” have been taking over almost everybody’s lives on the internet. Selfies are flooding your Facebook and Twitter feed, becoming a nuisance to people’s daily lives. While these dreaded selfie-takers may think their little activity is harmless fun, little do they know they are actually harming themselves in many ways with each and every selfie they snap.

One may wonder how something so simple as taking a picture of yourself could cause any harm. Let’s start out with some of the obvious ways. In 2014, there were numerous reports of deaths caused by people taking selfies while doing something ridiculous. Here are just a few of them:

In April 2014, a Russian amateur photographer (17 years old) climbed atop a railway bridge in Saint Petersburg. She ended up losing her balance and falling to her death after taking a selfie.
In May, 2014, the pilot of a Cessna 150K and his passenger were killed when the pilot was distracted taking selfies and lost control of the plane.
In August 2014, a Polish couple fell off a cliff in Portugal after crossing a safety barrier to take a selfie. They were survived by their two children who were present at the scene.
Due to what seemed like a fun picture idea to some people at the time, is now a haunting reminder to family and friends that were left behind.

With the year 2014 being proclaimed as “The Year of The Selfie”, you can only imagine how many other people have gotten themselves in to a bad situation for the sake of a silly photo, or in some cases not so silly – referring to selfies where the person has some sort of weapon or explosive involved. Yes, it has been done. There have been other reports on people posing for a selfie with a gun to their head, resulting in death, or severe injury (shocking, right?).

Besides the psychological harm that can be caused to the families of the people killing themselves with selfies, there have also been studies shown that selfies have links to narcissism and self-objectification. While this is a relatively small issue, it is something that is being noticed more and more by professionals.

(You may learn more about the connection between narcissism and selfies.)

More serious psychological disorders to selfie-taking individuals include Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and Body Dysmorphic Disorder (a chronic mental health condition in which the sufferer obsesses over perceived flaws with their body).

An extreme example of OCD and BDD is (now 20 year old) Danny Bowman. In his quest of taking the perfect selfie, Danny dropped out of school, lost 28 pounds, and spent up to 10 hours a day taking over 200 selfies, just trying to capture the perfect one. After months of selfie-taking, and countless fights with his parents, Danny soon realized that he could not ever take the perfect selfie. He eventually tried to commit suicide.

While this is obviously an extreme case, the possibility of similar more milder cases is extremely high. People are spending less time interacting with others because they are so caught up in themselves. What starts out small could turn into something so big and out of control, like what happened to Danny Bowman.

People are spending so much time taking glamour shots of themselves that they are letting this world slip right pass them. I, for one, will no longer stand by and watch the selfie take over. We have to stand up together, as Anti-Selfie Supporters and fight, not only for ourselves, but also for the people being plagued by the selfie. If we do not stand up for them, nobody else will.

#StopTheSelfie.

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Unmotivated Child

By James Lehman, MSW

Getting into the back-to-school routine can be hard for everyone in the house. In the morning, parents are faced with groggy kids who won’t get out of bed and get ready for school no matter how much you nag, bribe and scold. Homework time can be even worse, with nightly fights and accusations echoing off the walls of your home. So how can you get your child to be more motivated? The important thing to remember is this: your child is motivated—they’re just motivated to resist you. Keep reading to find out how you can turn this negative motivation into a positive one.

Q: When a child becomes unmotivated and won’t get out of bed, do homework or participate in activities, what is he trying to tell the parent through this behavior?

James:
When we’re talking about kids not getting out of bed, not doing their homework or school assignments or not wanting to get involved in family activities, it’s important for parents to realize that there is motivation in the child. But the motivation is to resist. The motivation is to do things their way, not yours, and to retain power.

When people feel powerless, they try to feel powerful by withholding. A child or teenager who feels very powerless will stay in bed, not go to school, avoid homework, sit on the couch and withhold overall involvement because it gives them a sense of being in control. To the parent, the behavior looks completely out of control. But the child sees it as the only way to have power over what’s going on around him.

“You have to have the courage to let him experience the natural consequences of his behavior.”
The child who uses resistance to control lacks both social skills and problem solving skills. It’s important to define the difference between the two. Social skills are how to talk to other people, how to be friendly, how to feel comfortable inside your own skin and how to deal with people’s kindness. Problem solving skills are the skills that help kids figure out what people want from them, how to give it, how to deal with other people’s behavior, expectations and demands. Problem solving skills are needed to help a child handle being criticized in class. Many times the real reason kids don’t want to do their homework is because they’re simply lazy about the work or they don’t want to be criticized in class and held accountable for their work.

I want to be clear about this point: everyone is motivated. The question is, motivated to do what? If a child looks like he’s not motivated, you have to look at what he’s accomplishing and assume that this is what he’s motivated to do. So part of the solution is getting him to be motivated to do something else. To assume that the child is unmotivated is an ineffective way of looking at it. He is motivated. He’s simply motivated to do nothing. In this case, doing nothing means resisting and holding back to exercise control over you.

You’ll see it when you ask your child a question and he doesn’t answer, but you know he heard you. What’s that all about? That’s a child withholding an answer to feel powerful. When he says, “I don’t have to answer you if I don’t want to,” you see it as a lack of motivation. He sees it as a way to win control over you.

Q: As parents, we tend to respond to this unmotivated behavior by coaxing, arguing and screaming at the child. Or you just give up and do the child’s tasks for him because you don’t see another way. It doesn’t work, but it’s all you can do, it seems.

James:
Very often these kids are motivated by a power struggle. They find different ways to have that struggle with their parents. The job of the parents in this case is to find other ways for the child to solve the problem that’s inherent in the power struggle. But if parents don’t have those other ways, then they just get locked into the power struggle.

If you’re fighting day after day with a kid who won’t get out of bed, you’re never going to solve that problem. Because even if he gets out of bed, then he won’t brush his teeth. And even if he brushes his teeth he won’t comb his hair. Or he won’t wear clean clothes or he won’t do his homework. If continually resisting is how a child tries to solve the problem of authority, then parents will have a hard time until they teach the child how to solve that problem appropriately.

The first step in teaching kids the problem solving skills they need is to understand how they think and realize that these kids are not helpless victims. They’re simply trying to solve problems, but the way they’re solving them is ineffective, inefficient and distorted. You have to deal with this distorted attempt for control in a systemic way. To give a simplistic solution like taking away his phone or taking away his TV does not deal with the problem. It won’t work. You have to look at the whole comprehensive picture.

Q: So how can parents deal with this behavior more effectively, without screaming, arguing or “overdoing” for the child?

James:
I think parents should avoid giving the behavior power. When you yell at your child for lack of motivation, you’re giving the resisting behavior power. I understand that parents get frustrated and yell. The point I want to make here is that it won’t solve the problem. If you’re yelling or arguing with this child over these issues, you’re giving him more power in the struggle, and you don’t want to do that. Leave the choices really clear for the child. Use “I” words. “I want you to get up out of bed and get ready for school.” “I want you to do your homework now.” Then leave the bedroom. If the kid doesn’t do it, then there should be consequences. There should be accountability. If the kid says, “I don’t care about the consequences,” ignore it. Telling you he doesn’t care gives him a sense of being in control and a sense of power.

I would give consequences, and I don’t care if the kid doesn’t like it. If you don’t get out of bed, you shouldn’t be doing anything else. You shouldn’t get to play video games. You shouldn’t spend four hours in front of the TV. If you’re too sick to go to school, you shouldn’t be going out of the house. Those limits should be set and followed through.

Related: Learn how to motivate your child with consequences that really work.

I would always tell parents in my office that you have to have the courage to let him experience the natural consequences of his behavior. It takes a lot of courage to step back and say, “Okay, you’re not going to do your homework, and you’re going to get the grades that reflect that.” But in these cases, it can help to let the child experience the natural consequences of resistance. You don’t let the kid watch TV. You say, “Homework time is from six to eight. And if you don’t want do your homework in that time, that’s fine. But you can’t go on the computer, you can’t play games and you can’t watch TV. If you choose in that time period not to do your homework, that’ll be your choice. And if you fail, that’ll be your choice.”

Along with the plan to let him experience the natural consequences of his decision, build in rewards for success, if he does make the right decision. If my son failed a test, there was no punishment. But if he passed, there was a reward. It was very simple. We rewarded A’s and B’s. We didn’t take anything away for C; we just didn’t reward it. So my son strived to have A’s all the time. So with kids who resist, it’s important to have a rewards system as well as a consequence system.

Remember, natural consequences are an important part of life. That’s why we have speeding tickets. A speeding ticket is a natural consequence. If you go too fast, the policeman stops you and gives you a ticket. He doesn’t follow you home to make sure you don’t speed anymore. He lets you go. It’s your job to stop and take responsibility. If you don’t, you’re going to get another ticket fifteen minutes later. Natural consequences help people take responsibility, and they can be used to help kids take responsibility for things like going to school, participating in class and doing homework.

So when you’re interacting with a kid who appears unmotivated, remember that screaming, bargaining and doing things for him will not work. When you’re looking at this child, you have to remember, he is motivated. He’s just motivated to do something different than what you want him to do. He’s motivated to resist you. So the more power you put into it, the stronger his resistance gets. We don’t argue with kids because when we argue with them, we give them power. Focus on making that behavior powerless and give the consequences that you can give so that there’s accountability.

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Wisdom – Thought for Today

Reading or listening to something good everyday will keep my mind healthy and happy. Thinking good thoughts over helps me to remember what I have heard. Then I become so healthy that when difficult situations come my way I have the inner strength to face them.

@prinkle
@srocks


Email group

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@dipakpatel wrote:*

@[email protected]_0_0_D wrote:*

h2. Baby’s first time in the rain

Bumped for @sheetalvarunyadav2223

Dear source link is given above , pl. See imgur or
Google with same title, u may find it on reddit too.

These days none of @Magus or @opium or

@Crook

are active , else u would have got in less time than my response time.

The active members like @Troll or @Plato , @ravitejaa425, @prinkle, @farzimaal or @krishan42933 , @jit.billa947@ does not help me , they help for tricks only.

http://imgur.com/gallery/O...oe

Free vector troll 062218 troll
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@[email protected]_0_0_D wrote:

@dipakpatel wrote:

@[email protected]_0_0_D wrote:*

h2. Baby’s first time in the rain

Bumped for @@shetalvarunyadav2223@@

Dear source link is given above , pl. See imgur or
Google with same title, u may find it on reddit too.

These days none of @Magus or @opium@@ or @@Crook@@ are active , else u would have got in less time than my response time.

The active members like @Troll or @Plato , @ravitejaa425, @prinkle, @farzimaal or @krishan42933 , @jit.billa947@ does not help me , they help for tricks only.



http://imgur.com/gallery/O...oe


Do u have any trick ?

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@Troll wrote:

@Plato wrote:

@[email protected]_0_0_D Bhai! I have no knowledge of IT, Computers and related stuff. Kind of Computerly illiterate. Thanks for the tag. Good post.


Is this thread abt IT https://cdn1.desidime.com/assets/textile-editor/icon_eek.gif


Toh iska matlab [email protected]_0_0_D sir thread ka thread samajh aaya aaj? Toh yeh bataao inhone humo tag kyun kiya? Kisi ko kuch batana tha na? Wohi sab meri samajh nahin aata. Thanks.

Img 20160611 wa0014
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@[email protected]_0_0_D wrote:

@dipakpatel wrote:*

@[email protected]_0_0_D wrote:*

h2. Baby’s first time in the rain

Bumped for @sheetalvarunyadav2223

Dear source link is given above , pl. See imgur or
Google with same title, u may find it on reddit too.

These days none of @Magus or @opium or

@Crook


are active , else u would have got in less time than my response time.

The active members like @Troll or @Plato , @ravitejaa425, @prinkle, @farzimaal or @krishan42933 , @jit.billa947@ does not help me , they help for tricks only.



https://i.imgur.com/gallery/O...oe


Aaapne bulaya hum aaye https://cdn1.desidime.com/assets/textile-editor/icon_smile.gif bolo sir ji kaise yaad kiya https://cdn1.desidime.com/assets/textile-editor/icon_smile.gif just busy with life .

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A Summary of the Rules of a Good Sleep

There is nothing like a good night’s sleep, and few things more devastating than not being able to sleep well. As time progresses, it becomes a larger and larger problem, with symptoms such as moodiness, inability to concentrate and sheer exhausting are continuously ruining your day. So here’s a little cheat-sheet for you. Check it, you may have missed something.

And please, sleep well.

https://i.imgur.com/1MgaCj1.jpg

http://www.ba-bamail.com/content.aspx?emailid=1...

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https://i.imgur.com/RUuFfNO.png

Missing