Happy Anniversary of Getting Fired to Me Why lo...

Happy Anniversary of Getting Fired to Me Why losing my job was a great thing.

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Marisa Kabas

Happy Anniversary of Getting Fired to Me
Why losing my job was a great thing

Precisely three years ago, I was fired from my job.
Sorry, “laid off.”
No, I was right the first time. I was fired.
I’m brought into a conference room with the shades drawn and told that the company no longer needs my services — that my position is being eliminated, and my tenure expires today. I cry: In my memory, I softly weep, but in reality, I wail. Two people sit uncomfortably as tears sputter down my face and my head droops as I try to process what is happening.
It’s over.

After I escape the airless room, I flee to my desk, head down, avoiding eye contact with everyone in the office. I will myself to be invisible long enough to gather my bag, my pride and make it to street level. In the lobby, I run into my first friend at the company, ram my head into his shoulder, shake and sob, as he wraps his arms around my slumped body. After a few beats, I feel his grip loosen and I know it’s time to go.

The sharp March air slams my face as I exit the building, taking one more glance at the place. And then much to my surprise, I feel…relieved.
I’m free.

I learned a lot of things from this job — about how great humans can be, how hideous humans can be, my professional strengths and weaknesses. But above all, this job showed me what I’d always known in my heart to be true: that I was meant to write. And on the flip side, not meant to be doing what I was doing.
It also taught me about the meaning of freedom.

An implication of the word ‘freedom’ is that you’re making a conscious decision. You’re choosing your own adventure, and no one else’s opinions or actions have any influence. But that’s actually just one definition. The thing you realize after being thrown out on your ass is that sometimes you need freedom to be created for you. Did I hate my job? You bet. Was I going to leave before I found another job? Not a chance. Along with one month’s severance, I was given the invaluable gift of doing whatever the hell I wanted.
But freedom is also scary.

When you consider being free, you picture zip-lining in Costa Rica or taking a gourmet pastry class. Professional freedom is a completely different beast. The sheer volume of choice, of websites to peruse and people to connect with on LinkedIn and degrees you wish you’d gotten are overwhelming at best and soul-crushing at worst. It’s enough to make you exclusively kick-box, read novels and travel for a few months until you even feel ready to even explore a new professional frontier. Not that I’d know anything about that.

For a good while there, I was scared shitless. I couldn’t believe I had the audacity to think someone would pay me actual minted money to string words together and tell stories. Journalism school felt like another lifetime. And in many ways, it was. This was journalism 2.0; Marisa’s career 2.0; Life 2.0.
Now the job I was fired from precisely three years ago today feels like another lifetime.
In the hours after I slipped out of the office for good and dragged my limp body back to my apartment, a coworker emailed me to say how sad she was about my departure. She also told me I was “so talented and kind and capable”: I like to think she was right about that, even if my true ambition had not yet been revealed back then.

Another great thing about freedom is that it allows you to see who you really are. The pretty parts, the ugly parts. When you have no job to rush to each morning, you have the time to look at yourself long and hard in the mirror, sit with your thoughts for hours on end, and let another force within you do the driving for a while.
Once my body surrendered the memory of what was, it began to imagine what could be.
So just as you can never predict when you’ll be forced into freedom, you never quite know when you’ll be forced out of it. And when you give up freedom for a dream, I’ve learned, you no longer feel like a captive.

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Research finds employees more productive when they feel young

A new study has found that employees are more productive and achieve more when they feel younger than they are.

The study, It matters how old you feel by Florian Kunze, Anneloes Raes and Heike Bruch, identifies two factors that help employees to perceive themselves as younger: having meaningful work and the absence of age-exclusive HR practices.

They found that, where normally an employee’s focus will shift towards maintenance and loss-reduction as they age, in organisations where employees feel younger than their years they remain focused on professional development and growth. In turn, this leads to a business that is more productive and achieves more.

Image from gettyimages
“Clearly it is in the best interests of organisations to help their workforces feel younger than their chronological age,” Anneloes Raes writes in an article, It isn’t how old you are, but how old you feel.

In the study Raes and her colleagues looked at 107 German companies from five industry sectors: production, wholesale, retail, service and finance. They found that employees under the age of 25 actually felt slightly older than their age. But for the rest of the sample, the older the employees got, the younger they felt. Overall, in their sample, people saw themselves as an average of four years younger than their actual age.

However, other studies have found that there are huge differences between actual age and subjective age in different countries. In the UK, for example, the average gap between how old employees are and how old they feel is 10 years.

Virgin Hotels Richard Branson
Image from Virgin Hotels
Richard Branson is a keen supporter of the idea that it’s important to maintain a youthful approach in life – and especially in business. “It’s easy to get weighed down in the stresses of adulthood; however we should never lose our sense of adventure,” he says. “If happiness is the goal – and it should be! – then adventure should be a top priority. And, the Virgin Founder believes, the best way to enjoy the adventure is by invoking childlike sensibilities and seeking out fun.

“My number one rule in business and in life is to have fun. If you don’t enjoy what you’re doing then you shouldn’t be doing it. It’s that simple. Life is not a dress rehearsal, so, like a child, we shouldn’t waste time doing things that don’t light our fires. Don’t take yourself too seriously, and instead ask yourself is what I’m about to do going to make people smile. If the answer is yes, then do it.”

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How To Go From Successful To Very Successful (and why most people can’t do it)
Success is an obsession.

Many people want it more than anything else. And they’ll sacrifice everything to have it — which is often the cost of admission.

But there’s a problem. Sustaining success, and going beyond success is nearly impossible for most people. Hence Greg McKeown, author of Essentialism questions, “Why don’t successful people and organizations automatically become very successful?”
McKeown’s answer is succinct: Success is a catalyst for failure.
Being invisible is easy. When you make mistakes, you’re the only one who notices. Even being the underdog is easy. If you fail, you’re justified in doing so.

But when the spotlight is on you, everyone is waiting for you to fail. The external pressure often becomes too overpowering, smothering the values and vision it took to become successful in the first place.

Which is why success is often a short-lived experience. People come and go. Very few remain on top for long. For example, only eight NFL teams have won the Super Bowl back-to-back. As 49ers coach, Bill Walsh has said, “The toughest thing I ever had to do was get my team to overcome success disease.” Winning a first Super Bowl, according to Walsh, is enormously easier than winning a second or third.

This is true in all life domains. If you succeed in business, life doesn’t get easier. It gets harder.
Success Is Much Harder To Deal With Than Failure
“Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character, give him power.” — Abraham Lincoln
For most people, privilege is a poison.
Once you succeed, or have certain privileges (e.g., time, money, fame, accolades), one of two things happens:
Your focus shifts from the cause of your success to its effects. Rather than continuing to hone your craft you indulge in the benefits of your prior success, which inevitably damages future performance.
Or, you experience an intensification of internal pressure to keep succeeding. Many people can’t handle this level of pressure and it often ends careers prematurely. Yet, this escalation of internal pressure is what prevents a person from being consumed by external noise (i.e., distraction) that come with success. As Robert Horry, former NBA player has said, “Pressure can burst a pipe, or pressure can make a diamond.”
Internal, not external, pressure is what makes you successful. Increasing the pressure is what keeps you going.

From Successful To Very Successful
“Success is something you attract by the person you become.” — Jim Rohn
If “success” is your primary objective, you probably won’t get it. Chasing success is like chasing happiness. You can’t pursue it directly. Both success and happiness ensue from something far more fundamental — who you are.
Success comes from consistency to your vision and values. Although difficult because of the added noise that comes from success, becoming “very” successful requires remaining consistent to your vision and values — who you are.
When you stay consistent and true, you’ll continue to hone your craft, even after you become world-class.
You’ll say “no” to all of the distractions that come your way, no matter how enticing they are.
You won’t let your ego inflate and forget who you really are. You won’t abandon your values and the most important people in your life.
Success is over-rated. It’s the game most people are playing. And it’s generally a losing game.
A bigger and better pursuit — with far less competition — is becoming very successful and sustaining that success.

https://medium.com/life-learning/how-to-go-from...

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Should You Avoid or Embrace the Job Hopper?

ANDRE LAVOIE

Entrepreneur; CEO and Co-Founder, ClearCompany

Job hoppers are becoming more readily accepted in today’s workforce. A CareerBuilder survey of 2,138 hiring managers and HR professionals, conducted last year, found that more than half (55 percent) of employers surveyed said they have hired a job hopper, and nearly one-third (32 percent) of all employers said they have come to expect workers to job hop.

The stigma associated with not staying in one position, or at one company for very long, is fading. So should employers embrace or continue to avoid job-hopping candidates? Here are three reasons to reconsider hiring the candidate with perhaps a little too much experience (and which candidates to avoid):

1. They’re quick to adapt.
While working at multiple companies in a short period of time may seem like a red flag, it can also work to an employer’s advantage. A previously nomadic lifestyle can give candidates a wide range of experience, in diverse work environments.

This makes it easier for new hires to adapt to their new work environment and better assimilate. A candidate who has little to no experience elsewhere will, most likely, take a bit longer to adjust. More roles, environments and sectors means more experience.

What to avoid: Rather than avoiding job hoppers altogether, steer clear from career hoppers. Career hoppers, unlike job hoppers, may still be unsure of what they want to do. A candidate’s resume should ideally be chock full of relevant experience that has helped them grow within their respective industry — not just list unrelated jobs ranging from chef to ad sales rep.

2. They have a large network of contacts.
It’s reasonable to believe that job hoppers will have more business contacts than someone who has been with the same company for an extended period of time. Working for multiple companies can help employees build an impressive network of contacts within their industry. This can be advantageous to employers, as it offers them a whole new network of work-related resources.

What to avoid: When evaluating job hoppers, take their references (or lack thereof) into consideration. A candidate who has held several different positions should have a decent amount of professional references to vouch for them. A job hopper with a shortage of good references is also unlikely to bring with them a large network of valuable contacts.

3. They have a range of skills.
Job hoppers are given the opportunity to continually hone their skills. With each new position comes new challenges, professional development opportunities and increased skill sets. Not to mention, working at multiple companies means working with a number of professionals, each with their own skills and abilities to learn from. Job hoppers can often make well-rounded employees.

What to avoid: Job hopping can sometimes be a sign of ambition, or it can be a sign of a disatissfied or lazy employee. To avoid hiring the latter, look past the date ranges and focus on the successes in those roles.

When it comes time to hire, don’t be too quick to judge a candidate based on the number of jobs they’ve had or the length of time they’ve stayed with a company. Instead, aim to find out the reason behind the job hopping and what the candidate has taken from it.

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Dr. Travis Bradberry

Coauthor Emotional Intelligence 2.0 & President at TalentSmart
Curious Things That Will Kill Your Career

There are so many things that can kill the careers of good, hard-working people. Honest mistakes often carry hard-hitting consequences.

We usually only hear about the more egregious examples, such as when Yelp employee Talia Jane became an Internet sensation last month for writing a blistering post criticizing the company’s low pay and its CEO. To no one’s surprise, she quickly found herself out of a job.

Most people don’t go down in a blaze of glory like Talia Jane; they kill their careers in subtle, decidedly undramatic ways. And it’s a shame because it happens all the time.

A recent survey by VitalSmarts found that 83% of people had seen someone make a blunder that had catastrophic results for their career, reputation, or business, and 69% admitted that they themselves had done something that had damaged their careers:

31% said it cost them a promotion, a raise, or even a job
27% said it damaged a working relationship
11% said it destroyed their reputation
These numbers show how damaging you can be to your own career if you’re not careful. There doesn’t have to be a single, sickening moment when you realize that you just shoved your foot firmly in your mouth, either. Little things can add up over time and undermine your career just as much as (or more than) one huge lapse in judgment. The good news is that if you stay aware of them, these are all things that you can control before they creep up on you and kill your career.

Over-promising and under-delivering. It’s tempting to promise the moon to your colleagues and your clients, especially when you’re honest and hardworking and believe that you can do it. The problem is that there’s no point in creating additional pressure that can make you look bad. If you promise to do something ridiculously fast and you miss the deadline by a little bit, you’ll likely think that you did a good job because you still delivered quickly. But the moment you promise something to someone, they expect nothing less. You end up looking terrible when you fall short, which is a shame, because you could have done the same quality work in the same amount of time with great results if you’d just set up realistic expectations from the beginning. This is one of those situations where perception matters more than reality. Don’t deliberately undershoot your goals; just be realistic about the results you can deliver so that you’re certain to create expectations that you will blow out of the water.

Complacency. How long has it been since you proactively learned a new skill, reached out to your networking contacts, or even polished up your resume? If you can’t remember, you might have become a bit complacent, and complacency is a real career killer. It’s what happens when you’re just along for the ride and assume that nothing will ever change. But we’ve seen enough disruption—technological and otherwise—over the last few years to realize that change is inevitable. If you’re always too busy to learn something new or to expand your network, you’ve got your priorities mixed up. However, if you make continuous growth and development a priority, you’ll be ready for whatever comes your way.

Fear of change. Fear of change is complacency’s evil twin. It actively works to keep things the same. I’m sure you’ve seen this one first hand at work when someone uttered the dreaded words, “But we’ve always done it this way.” Things are changing too fast these days to latch on so tightly to the status quo, and the costs of doing so can be huge. In one survey, 91% of respondents said that the most successful employees are the ones who can adapt to the changing workplace. Change is a constant part of our lives, both personally and professionally. It doesn’t matter whether you think things should change or whether you prefer the old ways—change just is. You don’t have to learn to love it, but you do have to learn to stop resisting it and to start adapting to it.

Having an inflatable ego. Did you ever work with someone who had a string of successes and started thinking that they were the be-all and end-all of superstardom? Success is great. It definitely boosts your career, and it feels really, really good. The problems start once you let it go to your head. You start thinking that success is going to last forever and that you’re entitled to it. Never, ever be content with resting on your laurels. Once you start thinking that you’re the cat’s meow, you’re setting yourself up for very painful failure.

Losing sight of the big picture. It’s easy to become head-down busy, working so hard on what’s right in front of you that you lose sight of the big picture. But smart people learn how to keep this in check by weighing their daily priorities against a carefully calculated goal. It’s not that they don’t care about small-scale work; they just have the discipline and perspective to adjust their course as necessary. Life is all about the big picture, and when you lose sight of it, everything suffers.

Negativity. Sometimes when you’re feeling negative and down, your mood can leak out and affect other people, even if you don’t intend it to. You were hired to make your boss’s and your team’s jobs easier, not harder. People who spread negativity through their department and complain about the work or other people complicate things for everyone else. If people always have to tiptoe around you so as not to dislodge that massive chip on your shoulder, they are unlikely to be willing to do it for very long.

Low emotional intelligence (EQ). Everyone knows that you can get fired for being unable or unwilling to play nicely with others, but what trips up a lot of people is having a poorly developed poker face. If everyone can tell when you’re bored or irritated or that you think something a colleague says is stupid, this will catch up with you. Emotional outbursts, belittling others, shutting co-workers down when they speak, low self-awareness, and just generally being difficult are other ways that a lack of emotional intelligence will do great harm to your career.

Sucking up to your boss. Some people suck up to their boss and call it managing up, but that isn’t the case at all. Sucking up has nothing to do with a real relationship built on respect; it is sneaky and underhanded. Suck-ups try to get ahead by stroking the boss’s ego instead of earning his or her favor. That doesn’t go over well with colleagues who are trying to make it on merit. Yes, you want to bolster your relationship with your boss, but not by undermining your colleagues. That’s the key distinction here. For a boss-employee relationship to work, it has to be based on authenticity. There’s no substitute for merit.

Playing politics. Working hard to build strong work relationships is very different from instigating conflict, choosing sides, undermining colleagues, spreading rumors, and all of the other things that fall under the umbrella of “playing politics.” Again, it comes down to authenticity. If you find yourself sneaking around or if you’re embarrassed if some of your behind-the-scenes manipulations come to light, that’s politics. Stick to strategies you’d be proud to discuss in front of your colleagues.

Bringing It All Together

A lot of people make the mistake of thinking that they can only damage their careers by making one huge misstep, but the reality is that it’s usually not that dramatic.

Have you seen people killing their careers? Please share your thoughts in the comments section below, as I learn just as much from you as you do from me.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Dr. Travis Bradberry is the award-winning co-author of the #1 bestselling book, Emotional Intelligence 2.0, and the cofounder of TalentSmart, the world’s leading provider of emotional intelligence tests and training, serving more than 75% of Fortune 500 companies. His bestselling books have been translated into 25 languages and are available in more than 150 countries. Dr. Bradberry has written for, or been covered by, Newsweek, TIME, BusinessWeek, Fortune, Forbes, Fast Company, Inc., USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and The Harvard Business Review.

If you’d like to learn how to increase your emotional intelligence (EQ), consider taking the online Emotional Intelligence Appraisal® test that’s included with the Emotional Intelligence 2.0 book. Your test results will pinpoint which of the book’s 66 emotional intelligence strategies will increase your EQ the most.

Written by

Dr. Travis Bradberry

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THE INC. LIFE
How to Get Lucky and Stay Lucky
Here are 13 ways to take advantage of life’s lucky breaks and succeed.

BY LOLLY DASKAL

@LollyDaskal

Most people will tell you luck is about being at the right place with the right people at the right time—but there’s a lot more than that to luck.

The dictionary describes luck as events that influence your life but are not of your making.

If we believe we are in perfect control our lives, we are kidding ourselves. Even the most careful planning runs into the unexpected. That’s inevitable.

How we allow that unplanned change to play out is a huge component in how lucky we are.

Follow these 13 principles and see how your luck changes.

1. Position yourself. The first step toward improving your luck is to acknowledge that luck exists. Lucky people position themselves for luck by organizing their lives and work so they can embrace opportunities and weather storms.

2. Plan, but be ready to bail. Lucky people know their plans may not always work out, and they’re careful not to let themselves to grow too confident or relaxed. They anticipate rapid change and they don’t bet on everything they have on large irrevocable commitments. They’re ready to bail if they have to; they know luck has a way of evaporating when you lean on it.

3. Remember, luck comes and goes. It’s not that lucky people feel unassailably secure—more that they refuse to relax. They keep their options open and explore new possibilities.

4. Don’t take the blame. Lucky people don’t feel responsible for their luck—when they have a streak of bad luck they don’t blame themselves. Instead, they look for ways to turn it around.

5. Go where luck resides. Lucky people surround themselves with people who have things happening for them. Cultivate the kind of personality that gets you noticed, and then make contacts and get involved.

6. Stick your neck out. The lucky ones know that you have to invite luck to happen—in other words, stick your neck out. Take some risks and be willing to accept what may come—good or bad—and deal with both as it unfolds.

7. Never say anything’s 100 percent sure. Lucky people know that some of their decisions will be wrong, so even though they take risks they don’t set themselves up to fail by expecting success to hit every time.

8. Don’t push it. People who are lucky always assume that their luck will run out. They sell short and don’t ride the peak, because they know not to push their luck. It’s not about being a pessimist but a realist, with a rational approach to a world that is uncontrollable and unpredictable.

9. Don’t look for a straight path. Lucky people not only permit themselves to be distracted, they invite distractions. Their path is never a straight line. You never know where life will take you, and lucky breaks may come from something that you could not have imagined.

10. Lose with optimism. Lucky people are agile and flexible and ready to take detours when they need to. They expect the best but know how to handle the worst.

11. Listen up. Lucky people know that you learn more by listening than by speaking. When you listen you can observe more, see more, and know more. They also know it’s a lot harder to get yourself in trouble when you keep your mouth shut.

12. Partner up. Lucky people tend to have great partners. Of course, plenty of people do well on their own, but a solid partnership lets you build on two sets of strengths and gives you a sounding board for new ideas.

13. Stay busy. Lucky people always seem to have more than one venture going on at the same time, so if one thing doesn’t work out there are plenty of other options.

A consistently lucky person is someone who sees life for what it is—and what it is not—and does all they can to be flexible, agile, observant, optimistic, and understanding.

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7 Mistakes Leaders Make That Drives Everyone Crazy

Travis Bradberry

TRAVIS BRADBERRY
CONTRIBUTOR
Co-author of Emotional Intelligence 2.0 and President at TalentSmart

From Enron to Volkswagen, we’ve watched in horror as leaders who lack integrity have destroyed businesses time and again. But the real tragedy happens when regular leaders, who are otherwise great, sabotage themselves, day after day, with mistakes that they can’t see but are obvious to everyone else.

In most cases, it’s slight and often unintentional gaps in integrity that hold leaders, their employees, and their companies back. Despite their potential, these leaders harm their employees and themselves.

“Look for three things in a person: intelligence, energy, and integrity. If they don’t have the last one, don’t even bother.” –Warren Buffet

Dr. Fred Kiel did the difficult job of quantifying the value of a leader’s integrity for his book, Return On Character, and his findings are fascinating. Over a seven-year period, Kiel collected data on 84 CEOs and compared employee ratings of their behavior to company performance.

Kiel found that high-integrity CEOs had a multi-year return of 9.4%, while low integrity CEOs had a yield of just 1.9%. What’s more, employee engagement was 26% higher in organizations led by high-integrity CEOs.

Kiel describes high-integrity CEOs this way: “They were often humble. They appeared to have very little concern for their career success or their compensation. The funny point about that is they all did better than the self-focused CEOs with regard to compensation and career success. It’s sort of ironic.”

Kiel’s data is clear: companies perform better under the guidance of high-integrity leadership. “Companies who try to compete under the leadership of a skilled but self-focused CEO are setting themselves up to lose,” Kiel says.

Every leader has the responsibility to hone his or her integrity. Many times, there are integrity traps that have a tendency to catch well-meaning leaders off guard. By studying these traps, we can all sharpen the saw and keep our leadership integrity at its highest possible level.

1. Fostering a cult of personality.
It’s easy for leaders to get caught up in their own worlds as there are many systems in place that make it all about them. These leaders identify so strongly with their leadership roles that instead of remembering that the only reason they’re there is to serve others, they start thinking, ‘It’s my world, and we’ll do things my way.’ Being a good leader requires remembering that you’re there for a reason, and the reason certainly isn’t to have your way. High-integrity leaders not only welcome questioning and criticism, they insist on it.

2. Dodging accountability.
Politicians are notorious for refusing to be accountable for their mistakes, and business leaders do it too. Even if only a few people see a leader’s misstep (instead of millions), dodging accountability can be incredibly damaging. A person who refuses to say “the buck stops here” really isn’t a leader at all. Being a leader requires being confident enough in your own decisions and those of your team to own them when they fail. The very best leaders take the blame but share the credit.

3. Lacking self-awareness.
Many leaders think they have enough emotional intelligence (EQ). And many times, they are proficient in some EQ skills, but when it comes to understanding themselves, they are woefully blind. It’s not that they’re hypocrites; they just don’t see what everyone else sees. They might play favorites, be tough to work with, or receive criticism badly. And they aren’t alone, as TalentSmart research involving more than a million people shows that just 36% of us are accurate in our self-assessments.

4. Forgetting that communication is a two-way street.
Many leaders also think that they’re great communicators, not realizing that they’re only communicating in one direction. Some pride themselves on being approachable and easily accessible, yet they don’t really hear the ideas that people share with them. Some leaders don’t set goals or provide context for the things they ask people to do, and others never offer feedback, leaving people wondering if they’re more likely to get promoted or fired.

5. Not firing poor performers.
Sometimes, whether it’s because they feel sorry for an employee or simply because they want to avoid conflict, leaders dodge making the really tough decisions. While there’s certainly nothing wrong with being compassionate, real leaders know when it’s just not appropriate, and they understand that they owe it to the company and to the rest of the team to let someone go.

6. Succumbing to the tyranny of the urgent.
The tyranny of the urgent is what happens when leaders spend their days putting out small fires. They take care of what’s dancing around in front of their faces and lose focus of what’s truly important—their people. Your integrity as a leader hinges upon your ability to avoid distractions that prevent you from putting your people first.

7. Micromanaging.
You see this mistake most often with people who have recently worked their way up through the ranks. They still haven’t made the mental shift from doer to leader. Without something tangible to point to at the end of the day, they feel unproductive, not realizing that productivity means something different for a leader. As a result, they micromanage to the point of madness and fall off schedule. An important part of a leader’s integrity rests in giving people the freedom to do their jobs.

Bringing it all together

The bad news is that these mistakes are as common as they are damaging. The good news is that they’re really easy to fix, once you’re aware of them.

A version of this article first appeared at TalentSmart.

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[ ♥How to Decline a Job Offer ::: ]

1.Call promptly. As soon as you know you won’t be able to accept the position, make the call. The longer you dilly-dally, the longer it will take for your potential employers to hire another candidate. You’re already rejecting your potential employers, so the least you can do is be as efficient as possible.
As soon as you’ve accepted another position or have realized that the job will be impossible for you to take because of the compensation, responsibilities, commute, work environment, or whatever reason, place the call.
You should call the hiring officer or recruiter who made you the offer.

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2.
Be thankful first. Before you reject the job offer, take the time to show the company how much you appreciate the offer and how hard they worked to make you feel comfortable at the company, to show you around and introduce you to people, or whatever else they did.
Thank not only the person you’re calling, but try to name a few people in the company who were also helpful to you.
Use a few kind adjectives to describe the people or person who interviewed you. You can say the person was kind, thoughtful, welcoming, professional, or whatever works best for the situation.
Don’t overdo it. You don’t have to spend an hour thanking the person over the phone. Just two or three sentences will do. Cut to the chase.
Maintain the right tone. Though you are complimenting the company, it should start to become obvious that you are not calling to deliver good news. Don’t sound so enthusiastic that the person will be genuinely shocked to hear you won’t be taking the offer

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3.Reject the offer. After you’ve thanked the person, clearly state, in no uncertain terms, that you will not be accepting the offer. You can start off by saying, “Regrettably…” or “Unfortunately…” before you deliver the bad news. Then you can briefly state a reason for why you chose not to accept the offer.
Be diplomatic. You don’t have to be completely honest if you are feeling negative. Treat this person as a future potential employer, and state everything as politely as possible.
Speak clearly and steadily. Though you may be rushing to get off the phone, you should sound clear and confident when you deliver the message.
You don’t have to go into detail. For example, if you just got a bad vibe when you visited the office, or if you realized the position was completely beneath you, you can just say, “The job did not meet my career objectives.” You can also say that the job did not suit your needs.
If you got another job offer, great. That will make the whole process a little easier. Just say that you found another position that meets your career objectives more, or which is more aligned with your career objectives.
Stress that this was a tough decision to make, and that you really wish it could have worked. Don’t make it sound like you don’t care about the company at all.
Maintain a sincere and even tone. Show the person that you really do regret the decision.

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4./Answer any questions you are asked. It’s likely that you’re not off the hook yet. After you make it clear that you’re rejecting the job, you will be asked some more questions about your decision-making process.
Be polite and professional. Even if you feel like you’re getting grilled and are dying to get off the phone, answer the questions with the level of specificity you want to use.
Give your full attention. Even if you’re feeling uncomfortable or calling during a busy time, listen to the person completely to show that you still care and that the company should think of you in the future.
Be courteous. Maintain a positive and complimentary tone, no matter what you are saying.
Don’t offend the company. If the benefits package was just not enough for you, for example, don’t say the company was “cheap.”

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5. Finish with grace. Once you have made your goal and have answered every question you were asked, it’s time to get off the phone. After all, the hiring officer on the other end has to go try to find someone else to fill your potential position, so ending the conversation will benefit both of you.
Again, thank the person for his or her time and effort.
End with a small compliment. Remind the person that you were impressed with the company.
Wish the person and the company luck in all of their future endeavors.

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Tips

If you’re rejecting a job offer through email, you don’t have to write the employer’s address at the top.
If you’re rejecting a job offer because of the compensation package, remember that you have the power to negotiate.
Warnings

Never make a negative remark about a business or employee when declining a job offer.
Don’t burn any bridges by neglecting to formally decline a job offer. There is no guarantee that a future job will work out for you or a new employer. If it turns out that it doesn’t, then you may have to return to your former option, which means reapplying for that position.

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ONLY THE SMARTEST GET THE JOB..

Questions and answers are the basics of any job interview,
Here is something the so called management gurus’ ’ll never share with you.

Gone are the days when the bosses were the smartest, if you are more free and witty better the chances of getting hired…
Here are some routine questions but out of the box answers…

Q: Tell us about yourself
A: YOURSELF is pronoun used when the subject and object of the verb are you.

Q: Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
A: Asking stupid questions to new candidates.

Q: What are your expectations?
A: Salary on time.

Q: What challenges you faced in your earlier job?
A: Staying awake after lunch.

Q: Why do you want to join our company?
A: Firstly, nobody hiring me, secondly this is very close to my home.

Q: Well, what attracts you to our company?
A: The receptionist.

Q: Why you left your previous job?
A: Previous company shifted office but never gave me new address.

Q: Are you willing to travel 20 days a month?
A: Yes Sir!!! Just don’t ask where I had gone.

Gentleman you are hired join us immediately and keep the wittiness intact, we need sharp and alert people.

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There lived a blind saint in an ashram in the kingdom of Emperor Akbar who predicted the future correctly. Once, he had visitors who had come to treat their niece. The child’s parents were killed in front of the girl’s eyes. Once she saw the saint, she started to scream loudly saying that that saint was the culprit. The couple went to Birbal to seek help. In front of all the ministers, he drew a sword and neared the saint to kill him. The saint in bewilderment immediately drew another sword and began to fight. Thus, everyone found out that he wasn’t blind.

At a workplace, people sometimes try to manipulate others, so be wary of them.

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It was peak winters and the ponds were frozen when Akbar asked Birbal if a man would be inside the frozen pond throughout the night, without any attire for money. Birbal agreed. The next day, Birbal came to the court along with a poor Brahmin whose family was starving. He agreed to be in the pond all night. The whole night he was inside the pond, shivering. He returned to the durbar the next day to receive his reward. The king asked how he managed to withstand the extreme temperature all through the night. He replied, ‘I could see a faintly glowing light a kilometer away and I withstood with that ray of light.’

Akbar wasn’t convinced and refused to give him any reward. The Brahmin went to Birbal asking for help. Thereafter, Birbal stopped coming to the durbar and sent a messenger to the king saying that he would come to the court only after cooking his khichdi. After a few days, the king himself went to Birbal’s house to see what he was doing. Birbal had lit the fire and kept the pot of uncooked khichdi one meter away from it. Akbar questioned him, ‘How will the khichdi get cooked with the fire one meter away?’

Birbal replied, ‘When it was possible for a person to receive warmth from a light that was a kilometer away, then it is possible for this khichdi, to get cooked too. Akbar understood his mistake and rewarded the Brahmin man with 2000 gold coins.

It’s possible to handle such situations without anger or frustration. If Birbal could make Akbar realise his mistake without making him feel embarrassed, so can you.

Thumbimgcrop 1450249086032
Deal Subedar
1
128
1982
16
@[email protected]_0_0_D wrote:



ONLY THE SMARTEST GET THE JOB..



Questions and answers are the basics of any job interview,
Here is something the so called management gurus’ ’ll never share with you.

Gone are the days when the bosses were the smartest, if you are more free and witty better the chances of getting hired…
Here are some routine questions but out of the box answers…

Q: Tell us about yourself
A: YOURSELF is pronoun used when the subject and object of the verb are you.

Q: Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
A: Asking stupid questions to new candidates.

Q: What are your expectations?
A: Salary on time.

Q: What challenges you faced in your earlier job?
A: Staying awake after lunch.

Q: Why do you want to join our company?
A: Firstly, nobody hiring me, secondly this is very close to my home.

Q: Well, what attracts you to our company?
A: The receptionist.

Q: Why you left your previous job?
A: Previous company shifted office but never gave me new address.

Q: Are you willing to travel 20 days a month?
A: Yes Sir!!! Just don’t ask where I had gone.

Gentleman you are hired join us immediately and keep the wittiness intact, we need sharp and alert people.

instead of sharp the answers seems to be given by dumb people 😁

Thumbimgcrop 1450249086032
Deal Subedar
1
128
1982
16
@[email protected]_0_0_D wrote:



ONLY THE SMARTEST GET THE JOB..



Questions and answers are the basics of any job interview,
Here is something the so called management gurus’ ’ll never share with you.

Gone are the days when the bosses were the smartest, if you are more free and witty better the chances of getting hired…
Here are some routine questions but out of the box answers…

Q: Tell us about yourself
A: YOURSELF is pronoun used when the subject and object of the verb are you.

Q: Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
A: Asking stupid questions to new candidates.

Q: What are your expectations?
A: Salary on time.

Q: What challenges you faced in your earlier job?
A: Staying awake after lunch.

Q: Why do you want to join our company?
A: Firstly, nobody hiring me, secondly this is very close to my home.

Q: Well, what attracts you to our company?
A: The receptionist.

Q: Why you left your previous job?
A: Previous company shifted office but never gave me new address.

Q: Are you willing to travel 20 days a month?
A: Yes Sir!!! Just don’t ask where I had gone.

Gentleman you are hired join us immediately and keep the wittiness intact, we need sharp and alert people.

instead of sharp the answers seems to be given by dump minds https://cdn2.desidime.com/assets/textile-editor/icon_toungueout.gif https://cdn2.desidime.com/assets/textile-editor/icon_toungueout.gif

Thumbimgcrop 1450249086032
Deal Subedar
1
128
1982
16
@[email protected]_0_0_D wrote:



ONLY THE SMARTEST GET THE JOB..



Questions and answers are the basics of any job interview,
Here is something the so called management gurus’ ’ll never share with you.

Gone are the days when the bosses were the smartest, if you are more free and witty better the chances of getting hired…
Here are some routine questions but out of the box answers…

Q: Tell us about yourself
A: YOURSELF is pronoun used when the subject and object of the verb are you.

Q: Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
A: Asking stupid questions to new candidates.

Q: What are your expectations?
A: Salary on time.

Q: What challenges you faced in your earlier job?
A: Staying awake after lunch.

Q: Why do you want to join our company?
A: Firstly, nobody hiring me, secondly this is very close to my home.

Q: Well, what attracts you to our company?
A: The receptionist.

Q: Why you left your previous job?
A: Previous company shifted office but never gave me new address.

Q: Are you willing to travel 20 days a month?
A: Yes Sir!!! Just don’t ask where I had gone.

Gentleman you are hired join us immediately and keep the wittiness intact, we need sharp and alert people.

instead of sharp the answers seems to be given by dump minds https://cdn2.desidime.com/assets/textile-editor/icon_toungueout.gif https://cdn2.desidime.com/assets/textile-editor/icon_toungueout.gif

Baba ji
Deal Lieutenant
7
382
4640
100

@[email protected]_0_0_D

You know what, as soon as I started reading your first, I thought that you somehow got my story read somewhere https://cdn1.desidime.com/assets/textile-editor/icon_smile.gif
Not exactly but quite similar too this happen to me.

One day in the morning as usual, I entered the office gates and I was told that I am not allowed to go inside. You have been fired. I was never expecting this as I never had any kind of issues with anybody in the office. I talked to the management… they told me the reasons.. there were some huge mis-understanding and they did not listen to me. I had 4 months old daughter, and recently left home to a rented place with wife. No bank balance and no earning sources https://cdn3.desidime.com/assets/textile-editor/icon_sad.gif It was very difficult time for me. Could not share this incidence with family ( they donno about this as yet after so many years).

I met with my old friend, discussed with him and I started going to his office which was vacant. From there, I started my own company. Worked hard and it paid off. After two years, I started earning good money and had good name in the business. Still doing the same business.

Thanks to ‘Him’ and my friends that I could survive.

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https://i.imgur.com/ldifSet.jpg

Missing