How To Answer "What's Your Current Salary ?"

How To Answer "What's Your Current Salary ?"

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*Liz Ryan

Founder and CEO, Human Workplace
How To Answer “What’s Your Current Salary?”*

You are almost guaranteed to get the question “What’s your current salary?” or “What are you earning now?” when you’re looking for a new job.

You have to be ready to answer the question with a smile while keeping your personal salary-history information private.

Lots of in-house recruiters and third-party recruiters take it for granted that they are entitled to know your current and past salaries, but that is a bad assumption on their part.

Of course they want to know what you are earning now and what you’ve earned at every job you’ve ever held.

It gives them and the employer they work for a huge negotiating advantage when they know your salary details. You would love to know what they paid the last person in the job, too, but they’re not about to give you that information — so why should you part with your salary information?

You may find it helpful to practice answering the question “What’s your current salary?” so that you can answer it smoothly and comfortably without stumbling.

RECRUITER: So, what’s your current salary?

YOU: In this job search I’m focusing on jobs in the $50K range. Is this position in that range?

RECRUITER: Probably, but I need to know your salary details.

YOU: I understand — many companies ask for that information but of course, that is my private financial data and my accountant has been very emphatic with me that it is not to be shared with anyone — just like your company would never share its salary data. Can you find out whether this opportunity pays in the $50K range? If so, then it may make sense for us to keep talking.

Now the recruiter has to make a decision. Either he or she lets a talented candidate drop out of the pipeline (you!) because he or she can’t stand to have a candidate refuse to roll over and play the submissive dog — or the recruiter has to go back to the client and say “I have a great candidate for you, and I don’t know the candidate’s salary details but I know their salary target, which is $50K.”

It’s a new day. We are all shaking the toxic lemonade out of our veins and realizing that there is no reason whatsoever for job-seekers to grovel and beg just to get a job.

Employers need talent. If they didn’t, they wouldn’t be wasting their time talking with you!

Some recruiters will bluster and harrumph when you tell them that you’re not going to give up your private salary information. Some of them may even have the nerve to talk about “transparency” and “trust.”

They want you to trust them and give them information that will be in their client’s possession within ten minutes after you cough it up, if you spill the beans. Then you can expect to get a job offer that’s a small jump up from your last salary level, even if your background should command a much greater sum.

Transparency and trust cut both ways. No recruiter would ever have to ask a job-seeker for his or her salary information if the employer had only included the salary range in the job ad!

Some recruiters will say “I can’t represent if you won’t give up your salary information” and if they say that, you can say “Great, I have lots to do and I’m sure you do too, so I’ll get off the phone now” and hang up.

Recruiters have nothing to sell and no way to make money unless they have qualified candidates like you ready to present to employers. For way too long, the ruling paradigm in recruiting has been “Employers make the rules, and job-seekers follow the rules.” Those days are over!

Google the terms “talent shortage” and “talent wars” and you’ll see what I mean. When you know that you bring something to the table that not every job-seeker does, you have leverage in the hiring process. Don’t give it away just because a recruiter bullies you!

What if you are completing an online job application and can’t proceed in the online job application process without filling in your salary details? Here’s how to handle that situation!

Questions and Answers

Here are answers to common salary-related questions recruiters and employer representatives will ask you.

You say your salary target is $55K, but how do I know that you’re worth that much if I don’t know what you were paid before?

Please ask me any questions you’d like about my background or about how I’d solve a problem you are facing in your company. You will certainly be able to gauge my qualifications and my market value, since you do this all the time!

By the way, does my $55K salary target match your hiring range for this position?

All the other candidates gave me their salary history. Why won’t you?

I understand completely. If you are overwhelmed with qualified candidates for this position, I’d hate to take up any more of your time!

You know, you have to trust me if we’re going to work together. I’ve been recruiting for a long time and I know what I’m doing.

For sure! I shared my salary target and if that is not sufficient for you or your client, I am happy to drop out of this process. If you follow Liz Ryan of Human Workplace you may know the adage “Only the people who get you, deserve you!” and that is my belief as well. I wish you all the best in filling this position!

Liz, I am a recruiter and I always ask my candidates for their salary history. My clients demand it!

I understand that clients can be pushy! This is a great time for you to find your voice and advise your clients rather than allowing them to walk all over you. You are a search consultant. Consultants don’t scurry off to do their clients’ bidding. They advise their clients!

You can tell your client "I understand why you’d like to have a candidate’s salary history, but that is no longer a standard request to make, and it’s a big turn-off to candidates to ask for that information.

“I can tell you whether or not a candidate is qualified for any job you are trying to fill, so you don’t have to worry about overpaying anyone. We’ll get the best candidates by respecting their boundaries!”

You have more influence than you think. Not every Tom, Dick and Harriett on the street can do what you do.

Don’t let anybody bully you into giving up personal information that no recruiter, HR person or hiring manager needs to evaluate your suitability for employment.

If they are pushy when they’re trying to recruit you, imagine what it would be like to work for them!

I want to learn how to evaluate my market salary and how to negotiate to get paid what I’m worth!

Check out the Four-Week Virtual Course “Know What You’re Worth and Get Paid for It!” You can follow your course over four weeks or get all four lessons delivered to you right away!

I want to learn how to recruit more effectively!

Take a look at the Four-Week Virtual Course “Recruiting With a Human Voice!”

Reach us with your questions here!

Written by

Liz Ryan
Liz Ryan
Founder and CEO, Human Workplace

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Huh, This doesn’t work in IT industry in India. Most of the recruiters want to know your salary to find out if they can afford you.Your hike is also calculated based on last drawn salary. I don’t see any point in keeping the salary private from recruiters.

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@cybertechie wrote:

Huh, This doesn’t work in IT industry in India. Most of the recruiters want to know your salary to find out if they can afford you.Your hike is also calculated based on last drawn salary. I don’t see any point in keeping the salary private from recruiters.

True said.

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Ten Questions Your Resume Must Answer In Ten Seconds

Liz Ryan
CONTRIBUTOR
I write about bringing life to work and bringing work to life.

There are only so many ways a hiring manager can come face-to-face with your resume. Here are the possibilities:

• They can view your resume on a screen, the way you’re reading this column right now. Imagine reading your resume on a phone.

• They can print your resume and read it on paper.

• They can receive a physical copy of your resume when someone hands it to them, or receive it in an envelope in the mail.

Gallery
14 of the Most Memorable Resume Errors
Launch Gallery
15 images

However your reader gets your resume, it’s only going to get a quick glance. The first phrase or sentence that grabs the reader will pull them in its direction, like a magnet.

Something in your resume will grab them, or nothing will grab them and they’ll put your resume down or turn the page on the screen.

IBMVoice
Three Ways To Navigate The IoT, The Business Of Things
That will be it. How many seconds elapsed while the manager scanned your resume? Maybe ten seconds!

Grab is the key verb. You have to grab their attention. You have to give them a reason to keep reading. Your resume has ten seconds to answer these critical questions that will be in a hiring manager’s mind.

You can answer all of them in your Human-Voiced Resume but you have to have the answers in your mind, first.

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What kind of work do you do?

We have to know what kind of work you plan to do. You have to go to the costume party with some kind of costume. The hiring manager has specific pain if s/he has pain at all. “I can do all kinds of things” is not a brand. The Summary at the top of your Human-Voiced Resume will tell us exactly what you do professionally.

Keep in mind that you can have as many versions of your resume as you want, branding yourself for as many career directions or ‘prongs’ as you can manage.

Here is Petra’s Not-for-Profit Marketing Summary. (She has four resumes, thus four slightly differently Summaries. Each one emphasizes a different aspect of Petra’s background.)

Not-For-Profit Marketer

I’m a Not-for-Profit Marketing person who loves to grow awareness and participation in sustainability and environmental efforts. I conceived and grew the Frog and Toad Society’s “Adopt a Tadpole” program to include 75 elementary schools, tremendous corporate sponsors and hundreds of individual donors.

I thrive in a fast-paced, make-it-work environment and love to design marketing programs from the ground up. I’m comfortable in traditional and social marketing, PR and trade show planning. I’m a budding public speaker who has spoken at two Not-for-Profit Marketing conferences so far and I’m looking for a new challenge.

How are you qualified to do this kind of work?

Petra did not wait to get into the body of her resume to give the reader (possibly her next manager) a sense of what she’s done. She knows that the manager doesn’t have any extra time. Petra is going to get into more detail about the Frog and Toad Society and her other jobs down in the body of her resume, but she gives the reader a taste of her awesomeness with a quick Dragon-Slaying Story in the Summary at the top.

Now the reader has gotten hooked by Petra’s story-magnet. The reader is intrigued. What’s the story with this Frog and Toad Adopt-a-Tadpole thing, anyway? The reader keeps reading and gets to the Frog and Toad section of Petra’s resume a little farther down the page. Now s/he can read all about what Petra did at the Society.

Do you have a sense of yourself professionally beyond “Here are the jobs I’ve held?”

Petra says in Summary that she knows who she is. There’s no hiding behind robot boilerplate language like “Results-oriented professional” for Petra—no way! She wants you to know who she is. She has no desire to cower behind her degree (which shows up on Page Two of her resume) or her certifications.

You can get your personality across on the page in your resume if you try. If you don’t try to do that, your personality will not get through the sludgy corporate zombie language. Once you’ve met 10 million “results-oriented professionals,” you don’t meet to meet any more.

Are you proficient in English?

For better or worse, your resume conveys your language skills. That’s a question many managers will have in their minds: “How’s your written English?”

Your resume will answer that question fast (or quickly, since “quickly” is an adverb and should be used to modify a verb like “answer” versus the adjective “fast” which should be used to modify a noun). I am not a fan of the language I call “taught English” with its fussiness.

I think it takes away from the human voice that will make your resume powerful and allow it to cut through the information overload in the reader’s brain. Still, you have to show the reader in your resume that you can write in the language you intend to do business in.

Do you know what kind of business I’m in (or we’re in)?

Petra customizes her resume before she sends it out. The Summary we saw above comes from Petra’s Not-for-Profit Marketing resume. She has four or five different versions that emphasize different aspects of her background.

You have to customize your resume to make it clear that you understand the organization you’re reaching out to. Don’t send a resume that says “I am an Administrative Professional in the legal industry” to a soft-drink bottling company! You’re telling them you’re in the legal industry but that’s not their industry. That’s not a good strategy.

Make sure that in your resume there is a connection to the organization you’re approaching, and to the job you are interested in—whether that job is posted anywhere, or not.

photo by Eamonn Wilcox
Photo by Eamonn Wilcox

Does your career history make sense?

Your career history has to make sense on the page. That’s why I don’t like ‘functional’-type resumes. Mother Nature is in charge. Any hiring manager with any interest in you is going to wonder “What is this person’s story?” A story is chronological. It has a beginning, a middle and an end. Give us the story in your resume!

If there are gaps, fill them in “Sabbatical” or “Private Projects” or “Independent Consulting.” If you helped your brother build his new house, that’s a consulting project.

Do you have the educational background I’m looking for?

Some managers care more about educational credentials than other ones do, but either way, you’ve got to tell your educational story in your resume. Most people include their school credentials at the end of the resume, at the bottom of page two.

Are the stories or accomplishments you highlight in your resume significant to me?

Tell stories in your resume, the way Petra did. You can tell Dragon-Slaying Stories in the Summary at the top of your resume or down in the body of it in your descriptions of each job you’ve held.

Are you smart?

Let’s be honest—the quality of your thinking is going to come through in your resume the same way your personality and your sense of direction are going to come through. Take the time to think about the words on your resume. They represent you, just like a song you would sing in a concert or any other expression of who you are.

You have no one to impress, but why not let your resume sing your song as faithfully as possible?

The world is changing. Your resume doesn’t have to be stiff and formal any more. I don’t want you to write a jaunty, bro-type resume either (I have seen a few of those!) but simply a thoughtful, human story about where you’ve been and where you’re going.

Are you running your career?

The reader can tell whether or not you believe you’re in charge of your career—just by reading your resume! You can have gaps and skips and changes in altitude in your history—lots of brilliant and creative people do. You only have to feel like the master and commander of the ship, not a galley slave tossed about by the high waves, powerless.

You have to convey in your resume that you’re on an amazing roller coaster ride and learning new things every day. Get that across in your resume. You are not a leaf blown about by the wind. You’re an eagle!

Liz Ryan is the CEO and founder of Human Workplace. Follow her on Twitter and read the rest of her Forbes.com columns here.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/lizryan/2016/03/12/...

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I am not asking annual package !

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@cybertechie wrote:

Huh, This doesn’t work in IT industry in India. Most of the recruiters want to know your salary to find out if they can afford you.Your hike is also calculated based on last drawn salary. I don’t see any point in keeping the salary private from recruiters.


Okay, let’s say you were in need of a job urgently after your MBA and hence took the first job which was offered to you right away for a 40K a month while others waited, took the right opportunity and received upto 90K-100K monthly salaries.

Now after a little while, you’ve settled down and your financial situation is a lot more better and you’re looking for a new job. You go for the interview, you talent is equal or maybe better than your friends who have their high paying jobs and you clear all the interview rounds but they were generally planning to pay 100K-120K per month to the selected candidate but you say your job was paying you 40K,

BOOM! They hit the right target. And offer you a 15% or a maximum of 20% increase and you think it’s a great deal.

But was it really?

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No rules in India. No laws to safeguard ones life. So basic rule is either they squeeze you or you squeeze them while negotiations. That’s it.
.
I have seen them ready for double offers but seeing candidates financial situations they decreased upto 90% of original offer they thought.
Don’t fall & be forward in field rather follower.

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This does not work in It industry in India. They have lot of ppl here..for other industry tell them it salary and ur demand .if they want u they will keep u

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@[email protected]_0_0_D wrote:

Ten Questions Your Resume Must Answer In Ten Seconds

Liz Ryan
CONTRIBUTOR
I write about bringing life to work and bringing work to life.

There are only so many ways a hiring manager can come face-to-face with your resume. Here are the possibilities:

• They can view your resume on a screen, the way you’re reading this column right now. Imagine reading your resume on a phone.

• They can print your resume and read it on paper.


• They can receive a physical copy of your resume when someone hands it to them, or receive it in an envelope in the mail.


Gallery
14 of the Most Memorable Resume Errors
Launch Gallery
15 images

However your reader gets your resume, it’s only going to get a quick glance. The first phrase or sentence that grabs the reader will pull them in its direction, like a magnet.

Something in your resume will grab them, or nothing will grab them and they’ll put your resume down or turn the page on the screen.


IBMVoice
Three Ways To Navigate The IoT, The Business Of Things
That will be it. How many seconds elapsed while the manager scanned your resume? Maybe ten seconds!

Grab is the key verb. You have to grab their attention. You have to give them a reason to keep reading. Your resume has ten seconds to answer these critical questions that will be in a hiring manager’s mind.

You can answer all of them in your Human-Voiced Resume but you have to have the answers in your mind, first.

Recommended by Forbes
You Are More Qualified Than You Think
The Truth About Progressive Discipline
How To Take Charge Of Your Career In 2016
Don’t Hire A ‘Change Agent’ — And Don’t Be One
MOST POPULAR Photos: Top College In Every State
Saudi Arabia Won’t Let Oil Prices Stay Over $40
MOST POPULAR Photos: Best And Worst States For Taxes

What kind of work do you do?

We have to know what kind of work you plan to do. You have to go to the costume party with some kind of costume. The hiring manager has specific pain if s/he has pain at all. “I can do all kinds of things” is not a brand. The Summary at the top of your Human-Voiced Resume will tell us exactly what you do professionally.


Keep in mind that you can have as many versions of your resume as you want, branding yourself for as many career directions or ‘prongs’ as you can manage.

Here is Petra’s Not-for-Profit Marketing Summary. (She has four resumes, thus four slightly differently Summaries. Each one emphasizes a different aspect of Petra’s background.)

Not-For-Profit Marketer

I’m a Not-for-Profit Marketing person who loves to grow awareness and participation in sustainability and environmental efforts. I conceived and grew the Frog and Toad Society’s “Adopt a Tadpole” program to include 75 elementary schools, tremendous corporate sponsors and hundreds of individual donors.

I thrive in a fast-paced, make-it-work environment and love to design marketing programs from the ground up. I’m comfortable in traditional and social marketing, PR and trade show planning. I’m a budding public speaker who has spoken at two Not-for-Profit Marketing conferences so far and I’m looking for a new challenge.

How are you qualified to do this kind of work?

Petra did not wait to get into the body of her resume to give the reader (possibly her next manager) a sense of what she’s done. She knows that the manager doesn’t have any extra time. Petra is going to get into more detail about the Frog and Toad Society and her other jobs down in the body of her resume, but she gives the reader a taste of her awesomeness with a quick Dragon-Slaying Story in the Summary at the top.

Now the reader has gotten hooked by Petra’s story-magnet. The reader is intrigued. What’s the story with this Frog and Toad Adopt-a-Tadpole thing, anyway? The reader keeps reading and gets to the Frog and Toad section of Petra’s resume a little farther down the page. Now s/he can read all about what Petra did at the Society.

Do you have a sense of yourself professionally beyond “Here are the jobs I’ve held?”

Petra says in Summary that she knows who she is. There’s no hiding behind robot boilerplate language like “Results-oriented professional” for Petra—no way! She wants you to know who she is. She has no desire to cower behind her degree (which shows up on Page Two of her resume) or her certifications.

You can get your personality across on the page in your resume if you try. If you don’t try to do that, your personality will not get through the sludgy corporate zombie language. Once you’ve met 10 million “results-oriented professionals,” you don’t meet to meet any more.

Are you proficient in English?

For better or worse, your resume conveys your language skills. That’s a question many managers will have in their minds: “How’s your written English?”

Your resume will answer that question fast (or quickly, since “quickly” is an adverb and should be used to modify a verb like “answer” versus the adjective “fast” which should be used to modify a noun). I am not a fan of the language I call “taught English” with its fussiness.

I think it takes away from the human voice that will make your resume powerful and allow it to cut through the information overload in the reader’s brain. Still, you have to show the reader in your resume that you can write in the language you intend to do business in.

Do you know what kind of business I’m in (or we’re in)?

Petra customizes her resume before she sends it out. The Summary we saw above comes from Petra’s Not-for-Profit Marketing resume. She has four or five different versions that emphasize different aspects of her background.

You have to customize your resume to make it clear that you understand the organization you’re reaching out to. Don’t send a resume that says “I am an Administrative Professional in the legal industry” to a soft-drink bottling company! You’re telling them you’re in the legal industry but that’s not their industry. That’s not a good strategy.

Make sure that in your resume there is a connection to the organization you’re approaching, and to the job you are interested in—whether that job is posted anywhere, or not.

photo by Eamonn Wilcox
Photo by Eamonn Wilcox

Does your career history make sense?

Your career history has to make sense on the page. That’s why I don’t like ‘functional’-type resumes. Mother Nature is in charge. Any hiring manager with any interest in you is going to wonder “What is this person’s story?” A story is chronological. It has a beginning, a middle and an end. Give us the story in your resume!

If there are gaps, fill them in “Sabbatical” or “Private Projects” or “Independent Consulting.” If you helped your brother build his new house, that’s a consulting project.

Do you have the educational background I’m looking for?

Some managers care more about educational credentials than other ones do, but either way, you’ve got to tell your educational story in your resume. Most people include their school credentials at the end of the resume, at the bottom of page two.

Are the stories or accomplishments you highlight in your resume significant to me?

Tell stories in your resume, the way Petra did. You can tell Dragon-Slaying Stories in the Summary at the top of your resume or down in the body of it in your descriptions of each job you’ve held.

Are you smart?

Let’s be honest—the quality of your thinking is going to come through in your resume the same way your personality and your sense of direction are going to come through. Take the time to think about the words on your resume. They represent you, just like a song you would sing in a concert or any other expression of who you are.

You have no one to impress, but why not let your resume sing your song as faithfully as possible?

The world is changing. Your resume doesn’t have to be stiff and formal any more. I don’t want you to write a jaunty, bro-type resume either (I have seen a few of those!) but simply a thoughtful, human story about where you’ve been and where you’re going.

Are you running your career?

The reader can tell whether or not you believe you’re in charge of your career—just by reading your resume! You can have gaps and skips and changes in altitude in your history—lots of brilliant and creative people do. You only have to feel like the master and commander of the ship, not a galley slave tossed about by the high waves, powerless.

You have to convey in your resume that you’re on an amazing roller coaster ride and learning new things every day. Get that across in your resume. You are not a leaf blown about by the wind. You’re an eagle!

Liz Ryan is the CEO and founder of Human Workplace. Follow her on Twitter and read the rest of her Forbes.com columns here.


http://www.forbes.com/sites/lizryan/2016/03/12/...


apni baat upar karni koi aapse sikhe…..!!!

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Richest selfie of the year

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Chinedu Duru
Managing Consultant at Hamilton Lloyd and Associates
Why you should listen when a Recruiter calls

Picture this scene -you are sitting at your desk or maybe even in a meeting and your mobile phone rings. You see a strange number and out of curiosity you decide to pick the call. The caller introduces him/herself as a Recruiter from XYZ Company. Your first thought is," How the heck did they get my number?!” Irritated, you are about to ask him/her how he got your mobile number and ask them never to call you again.

But hey, not so fast! That is a Recruiter calling. The one person who can change your life and career in one fell swoop!

Wiki describes a Recruiter or Head hunter (it always sounds like some ritualist when put that way) as someone engaging in recruitment or the solicitation of individuals to fill jobs or positions within an organization. They may work in an HR department or on an outsourced, third party basis.

Okay, you will argue that I am making a case for Recruiters-which is what I am (no shame there!). But it is a decent case to make! Your Recruiter can change your life, and that is the truth of the matter. In fact, I wish I could change my life/ career as well and as often as I change it for others!

Here are a few reasons why you should pick up that call, move out of earshot and listen attentively when your ‘friendly neighborhood’ Recruiter calls.

Recruiters make it their business to know the plum jobs in the market. They typically achieve this through personal contacts in corporate organizations, networking with other Recruiters, and unfortunately, having to pound the streets in back-breaking business development. The executives in these corporates many times have positions they want to fill discreetly, wishing to avoid publicity and possible internal upheavals that advertising a position online or in newspapers can cause. He informs his ‘favorite’ Recruiter who then calls you, if he believes you are qualified.

Secondly, you and your Recruiter have slightly different objectives that work very well together. You want a plum job, a career move that will take you from your N10 million per annum to N22 million per annum, perhaps more. Your Recruiter wants to provide his client with the best candidates possible for the role. Do you see the congruence of purpose here? Well, especially if you are one of those qualified? It’s a win-win situation for all three parties involved- Recruiter, Client and Candidate if you will take that call.

Thirdly, once you take that call from a recruiter (and you treated him or her nicely) there is a tendency for a relationship to initiate on the spot. The Recruiter then quietly slips into the role of your adviser, compensation expert, labor rights advocate, lawyer….even P.A. sometimes- considering how many times you have to remind some candidates to attend interviews and other forms of assessment they agreed to in the first place! Some Recruiters have been known to act as marriage counselors! (Just kidding!). The important thing is that a relationship develops and I have had cases where I have guided the careers of my candidates (now friends) way beyond the scope of work for many, many years. This of course includes, where off-limits rules do not apply, informing the candidate-friends about new opportunities as they arise.

Another important reason you must pick that call from your Recruiter is that your interaction with him will help you establish your worth in the market place. I have seen managers who were shocked at what they could potentially earn in their fields but had buried their heads in the corporate sands of one firm, like the proverbial ostrich!! The Recruiter tells you what you are actually worth as it is his job to know what salary ranges are across sectors in the economy.

There is also the educational role the Recruiter plays in the lives of the candidates. A candidate who has not been interviewed in say, 5 years, usually is tentative and ‘un-confident’ when he or she has to confront the job market. Part of the role the modern Recruiter now plays is to prepare candidates to face the whole job process. Many firms (ours inclusive) now offer outplacement services which revolve around helping candidates who are leaving job roles to resettle in new jobs- career transition and new career development in a nutshell. Aspects of outplacement include CV development, change management, psychometrics, interviewing and negotiation skills, etc.

So, is your phone ringing? Check it! It could be your Recruiter that has come calling. You have nothing to lose and everything to gain by accepting that call.

Written by

Chinedu Duru

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What To Do When You Catch A Liar

Travis Bradberry
CONTRIBUTOR

I cover emotional intelligence and leadership performance.
It’s a hard fact to accept, but your friends and co-workers lie to you regularly. The real challenge lies in how you respond once you catch someone in the act.

“I’m not upset that you lied to me, I’m upset that from now on I can’t believe you.” – Friedrich Nietzsche

Even though most people lie a lot—roughly two to three times during a ten-minute conversation, studies show—you don’t catch them nearly as often as you might think. Researchers from the University of California analyzed the results of 253 studies and found that we only spot about half the lies we’re told (53% to be exact). In other words, we’re about as likely to identify a lie as we are to win a coin toss.

The scary thing is that people who are trained in detecting deception—judges, customs agents, law enforcement officers, and even CIA agents—don’t fare much better. They can only spot a lie about 60% of the time.

What I Learned This Year At SXSW
When you do catch someone lying to you, it’s usually a real whopper. These are the kinds of lies that are so insulting to be the recipient that it’s hard to think straight. In these moments, you want to keep the conversation constructive, without letting the liar off the hook, which is a difficult thing to pull off.

And what about the times when you have a nagging sense that you’re being lied to but aren’t certain and don’t want to come across as paranoid or accusatory? While too much skepticism is never healthy, a small dose can be a very good thing, especially since we’re so poor at recognizing lies.

The question always becomes, what do you do with a lie? If you think someone is lying to you, do you call them on it? Do you tell someone else? Or do you just go along to get along?

There are actually several things you can do, and the right one, or the right combination, depends on the situation.

First, make certain you understand the rules. Before you decide what course of action to take, check the employee handbook and consider the recent history of similar situations. If you’re going to call someone out, you need to know what you’re getting yourself and the liar into. Know the severity of the consequences for lying, and make certain you follow proper protocol for addressing it, or the entire thing could backfire on you.

Option #1: Do nothing. Nobody likes being lied to, and the natural reaction is to call the liar out, but that’s not always the smartest thing to do, especially at work. Before you do anything, ask yourself, “What’s at stake besides my ego?” Carefully weigh the pros and cons before you take action. Consider who, if anyone, should know about the lie and the implications it has for the company. Sometimes, the animosity you avoid by staying silent is worth more than the satisfaction you receive from speaking out. Other times, the lie is serious enough that people have to know.

Option #2: Deflect with humor. Some lies are too big to ignore completely, yet too small to make a big deal out of. When this happens, you can always make a joke of it. Playful comments that acknowledge the lie will usually do the trick. Whether it’s “Hey, I think I just saw your nose grow a little bit” or “I need to get my prescription checked. When I looked at the scorecard, it said you shot 112,” this strategy gives the liar a chance to admit their slip-up without fear of reprisal. The key to making this tactic work is to give the impression that the other person was kidding around or intentionally exaggerating and never expected to be believed.

Option #3: Play dumb. Another way to let someone save face—and this is particularly appropriate for group settings—is to play dumb. Pretend you suddenly suffered a memory lapse or are confused about the facts. Ask lots of follow-up questions. The more details you request, the more likely it is that the truth will come out. Drawing it out gives the liar a chance to admit that they “misspoke” and correct themselves without being called a liar.

Option #4: Call them on it. In situations where doing nothing isn’t a good option, you can always call the liar out. You just need to think carefully about the best way to do this, and impulsively bashing them is never a smart move. You may choose to have a conversation with the liar in private or with others whom the lie affects. In either case, it’s important you have evidence that backs up your claim, or you very well may be called a liar yourself. Just make certain you are honest and direct with the person who lied. Don’t go to others with the lie when you know it’s better handled privately between you and the liar.

There are many times when reporting a lie is the right thing to do, both ethically and practically. Sometimes, not reporting a lie can cost you your job. However, there are a few things you need to think about before you take that step. First, question your motives. Are you thinking of telling someone about the lie out of concern that either another employee or the company could be harmed, or are you just mad? If it’s the latter, you run the risk of making yourself look petty; if it’s the former, stick to the facts. Don’t offer any hypotheses about why the person may be lying because that’s just supposition on your part. Stick to what the person said, what the truth is and any proof you have collected.

Not optional: Protect yourself. Whether you decide to call a lie or to let it go, once you know you’re dealing with a liar, it’s critical to take steps to protect yourself. One way to do that is to have a witness attest to what the liar said. Failing this, interact with the liar via email or text, both of which create a written record. Though if you’re dealing with a particularly savvy liar, they’re not going to commit to anything in writing. In that case, document the conversation yourself: who, what, when, where, etc., and cap it off by sending your lying colleague an email summarizing the conversation. That’s not as good as having proof in the other person’s words, but at least you’ll be able to make the argument that your colleague had the opportunity to correct you.

Bringing It All Together

Some people tell infrequent lies to make themselves look good or to protect themselves. Others are pros. They’ve been doing it their whole careers, they’re good at it, and they’ve learned how to avoid getting caught. That’s why there’s no single solution that works in every situation. The best thing to do is to carefully consider your options, thinking through the pros and cons of each course of action.

How do you handle liars?

http://www.forbes.com/sites/travisbradberry/201...

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Donation to the Community—the Fixed Deposit

There is an urgent need to change the name of Fixed Deposit, as the name fails to give the real meaning. The accurate name is DONATION TO THE COMMUNITY. Tied to an unchanging numerical figure, the real value can only decrease. It is the sacrifice of the ordinary man/woman for the economic prosperity of the country, with just no return, but a scrap of paper called the Fixed Deposit Receipt as the real value gets lost in the downward slide caused by prosperity which inevitably creates inflation.

The longer a Fixed Deposit is kept the greater the corrosion in the real capital value, which ultimately becomes zero if kept long enough or if the inflation reaches an unbearable rise. But prosperity means making profit, profit is seen as the higher selling price compared to the cost, higher, higher, higher….selling price means increasing inflation and fall in the capital value of the fixed deposit. It is sacrifice, donation which the Fixed Depositor is giving for the prosperity of the Society.

The so called income from interest is solidified misconception, as the rate of inflation is always greater than the rate of interest. It is fake income, unjustly included in the taxable income, which is increasing the total taxable income as a result of which the Assessee may fall into a higher tax bracket bloating his tax bill.
Development needs banking. Banks depend on Fixed Deposits. Today these vital donations misleadingly called fixed deposits to cover up the nobility of the ordinary man are getting criminalized. There is no income, it is just donation but the tax man is pouncing. If these donations stop the economy comes to a standstill. Imagine the depression in an economy of 130 crore people, individual depressions adding to the depressions of each other and becoming the gigantic mass economic depression. Removal of interest from the list of taxable incomes is the most urgent step, as that may stop the flow of donations called the fixed deposits.

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Salary. This is one word with phenomenal power to start or end a conversation.

If you ask a direct question to your colleagues as to how much she earns, you may find that she suddenly remembered an important task for which deadline is nearing. If you tell the same colleague how much the person sitting on the opposite desk earns, she may not show the same urgency to finish the given task. Salary remains a taboo, not just in India but World over. A survey by BBC, in 2010, wherein they asked people from all walks of life how much they earned, came up with some interesting findings. “We’ve been met with astonished glares, polite refusals, evasive generalities, embarrassed sniggers – and silence. Hardly anyone wants to reveal what they earn,” read an article published on its site. Stories on which CEO earns the most and where they stand in comparison with their peers draws immediate attention. Particularly, if it to do with the salary of bank CEOs since they are dealing with public money – the borrower who has to pay higher rate of interest on loans and the depositors who earns less on his savings. Once to dissuade journalists, a CEO whose salary was published, called to say that he fears his kids could be kidnapped if papers write such stories!‎ Another CEO said such stories may infuriate their colleagues.

People are keen to know others salary to understand where they stand in the pay distribution order.

In isolation, a person may be earning good enough to lead a luxurious life. But the moment they figure out the salary earned by fellow colleague they tend to benchmark themselves.

Unfortunately we live in a society where a person’s worth is equated with the salary they earn. Until this does not change, news and gossip on salaries and bonuses will continue to draw maximum attention.

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