QUIT ? Why good employees quit ?

QUIT ? Why good employees quit ?

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It’s tough to hold on to good employees, but it shouldn’t be. Most of the mistakes that companies make are easily avoided. When you do make mistakes, your best employees are the first to go, because they have the most options.

If you can’t keep your best employees engaged, you can’t keep your best employees. While this should be common sense, it isn’t common enough. Companies need to have rules—that’s a given—but they don’t have to be foolish and lazy attempts at creating order.

I understand the temptation. As my company has grown, so has our difficulty maintaining standards. There have been many instances where someone crossed a line, and we were tempted to respond with a new rule that applied to everyone.

But that’s where most companies blow it.

In just about every instance, upon closer inspection, we realized that establishing a new rule would be a passive and morale-killing way to address the problem. The vast majority of the time, the problem needs to be handled one-on-one by the employee’s manager.

When companies create ridiculous and demoralizing rules to halt the outlandish behavior of a few individuals, it’s a management problem. There’s no sense in alienating your entire workforce because you don’t know how to manage performance. It makes a bad situation that much worse.

Let’s explore some of the worst rules that companies create when they fall into this trap and see if we can’t influence people to think differently about making rules in the workplace.

The six-month rule. Most companies won’t let you transfer or get promoted until you’ve held a position for six months. This rule harms the company and the employee by holding people in roles that they’re not suited for. Companies might have gotten away with this rule when our parents were entering the workforce, but these days good people are more likely to jump ship, rather than wait around for some arbitrary rule to kick in.

An employee’s manager should have the freedom to decide when an employee is ready for a promotion or would perform better in a different role.

Ridiculous requirements for attendance, leave, and time off. People are salaried for the work they do, not the specific hours they sit at their desks. When you ding salaried employees for showing up five minutes late even though they routinely stay late and put in time on the weekend, you send the message that policies take precedence over performance. It reeks of distrust, and you should never put someone on salary that you don’t trust.

When companies are unnecessarily strict in requiring documentation for bereavement and medical leave, it leaves a sour taste in the mouths of employees who deserve better. After all, if you have employees who will fake a death to miss a day’s work, what does that say about your company?

Shutting down self-expression. Many organizations control what people can have at their desks. A life-size poster of a shirtless Fabio? I get it; that’s a problem. But employers dictate how many photographs people can display, whether or not they can use a water bottle, and how many items they’re allowed to place on their desks. Once again, it’s the ol’ “If I could just hire robots I wouldn’t have this problem” approach.

Same goes for dress codes. They work well in private high schools, but they’re unnecessary at work. Hire professionals and they’ll dress professionally. When someone crosses the line, their manager needs to have the skill to address the issue directly. Otherwise, you’re making everyone wish they worked somewhere else because management is too inept to handle touchy subjects effectively.

Restricting internet use. There are certain sites that no one should be visiting at work, and I’m not talking about Facebook. But once you block pornography and the other obvious stuff, it’s a difficult and arbitrary process deciding where to draw the line.

Most companies draw it in the wrong place.

People should be able to kill time on the Internet during breaks. When companies unnecessarily restrict people’s Internet activity, it does more than demoralize those that can’t check Facebook; it limits people’s ability to do their jobs. Many companies restrict Internet activity so heavily that it makes it difficult for people to do online research. The most obvious example? Checking the Facebook profile of someone you just interviewed.

Bell curves and forced rankings of performance. Some individual talents follow a natural bell-shaped curve, but job performance does not. When you force employees to fit into a pre-determined ranking system, you do three things: 1) incorrectly evaluate people’s performance, 2) make everyone feel like a number, and 3) create insecurity and dissatisfaction when performing employees fear that they’ll be fired due to the forced system. This is yet another example of a lazy policy that avoids the hard and necessary work of evaluating each individual objectively, based on his or her merits.

Banning mobile phones. If I ban mobile phones in the office, no one will waste time texting and talking to family and friends, right? Ya, right. Organizations need to do the difficult work of hiring people who are trustworthy and who won’t take advantage of things. They also need to train managers to deal effectively with employees who underperform and/or violate expectations (such as spending too much time on their phones). This is also hard work, but it’s worth it. The easy, knee-jerk alternative (banning phones) demoralizes good employees who need to check their phones periodically due to pressing family or health issues or as an appropriate break from work.

Stealing employees’ frequent-flyer miles. If there’s one thing that road-weary traveling employees earn, it’s their frequent flier miles. When employers don’t let people keep their miles for personal use, it’s a greedy move that fuels resentment with every flight. Work travel is a major sacrifice of time, energy, and sanity. Taking employees’ miles sends the message that you don’t appreciate their sacrifice and that you’ll hold on to every last dollar at their expense.

Draconian e-mail policies. This is a newer one that’s already moving down a slippery slope. Some companies are getting so restrictive with e-mail use that employees must select from a list of pre-approved topics before the e-mail software will allow them to send a message.

Again, it’s about trust. If you don’t trust your people to use e-mail properly, why did you hire them in the first place? In trying to rein in the bad guys, you make everyone miserable every time they send an e-mail. And guess what? The bad guys are the ones who will find ways to get around any system you put in place.

Limiting bathroom breaks. If you’re going to limit people’s trips to the bathroom, you might as well come out and tell them that you wish they were a bunch of robots. When you limit basic personal freedoms by counting people’s trips to the bathroom, they start counting their days at the company. The day you have to bring in a doctor’s note to prove that you warrant additional trips to the bathroom is the day you need to find another job.

Pathetic attempts at political correctness. Maintaining high standards for how people treat each other is a wonderful thing as we live in a world that’s rife with animosity and discrimination. Still employers have to know where to draw the line. Going on a witch-hunt because someone says “Bless you” to another employee that sneezed (real example) creates an environment of paranoia and stifled self-expression, without improving how people treat each other.

Bringing It All Together

If companies can rethink their policies and remove or alter those that are unnecessary or demoralizing, we’ll all have a more enjoyable and productive time at work.

Dr. Travis Bradberry is the award-winning co-author of the #1 bestselling book,Emotional Intelligence 2.0, and the cofounder of TalentSmart, the world’s leading provider of emotional intelligence tests and training, serving more than 75% of Fortune 500 companies. His bestselling books have been translated into 25 languages and are available in more than 150 countries. Dr. Bradberry has written for, or been covered by, Newsweek, TIME, BusinessWeek, Fortune, Forbes, Fast Company, Inc., USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and The Harvard Business Review.

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SOCIAL MEDIA BUZZ
‘Time for the Indian Army to bring democracy to Britain’: Boris-exit leaves Twitter in shock
by Scroll Staff
Published Jun 30, 2016 · 07:15 pm. Updated Jun 30, 2016 · 07:25 pm.
‘This is the most extraordinary day in British politics since yesterday.’
‘Time for the Indian Army to bring Democracy in Britain’: Boris-exit leaves Twitter in shock
Image credit: Jack Taylor and Scott Heppell/AFP
Boris Johnson will not be the United Kingdom’s next prime minister. The former mayor of London, who led the successful (if you can call it that) campaign for the UK to leave the European Union, announced on Thursday that he would not be running for the leadership of the Conservative party. Coming just days after David Cameron said he would be resigning from the prime ministership, that means the UK can neither draw on its current leader nor the man who spearheaded the Leave movement as it goes into withdrawal negotiations with the EU.

All of this presumes some British politician eventually works up the courage to actually trigger the EU withdrawal. Yes, the UK’s politics have gotten to the stage where there is a chance that its politicians might find it safer to ignore the results of a nationwide referendum.

Johsnon, a flamboyant politician who spent the last few months whipping his base into a frenzy about illegal immigration and the dangers of the EU, announced on Thursday that he wouldn’t run for the party leadership – effectively the prime ministership. This came as a shock because, as the person who campaigned so fervently for Brexit, he was expected to lead the UK during negotiations to see the process through.

As you might expect, this prompted a few responses on Twitter, most playing off the idea that Johnson “broke” the UK, so he should be the one who help fixes it.

If you look at it from an extremely cynical point of view – and anyone who follows British politics would do well to – Johnson’s move makes sense. As a comment on the Guardian soon after the Brexit vote pointed out, there is almost no upside to taking charge of the country during European negotiations.

Whoever is prime minister will have to watch the pound plummet and the British economy careen off a cliff, while attempting to convince Europe that the UK should not be left out in the cold. And they will also have to prevent Gibraltar from being repossessed by the Spanish as well as stave off a second independence referendum in Scotland. Not exactly a walk in the park.

Johnson would have been keenly aware of this, and so decided he was not going to pick up the hot potato after all. His campaign had also been dealt a strong blow earlier in the day when his Vote Leave co-campaigner Michael Gove announced that he would be running for party leadership. Gove specifically mentioned that he did not believe Johsnon could unite the party and lead the country.

This leaves Home Secretary Theresa May as the favourite. Which is a stunning turn of events.

Nevertheless, Johnson leaving the race actually turned out to be a positive sign to the markets and many others who considered the former London mayor a loose cannon.

This also inspired some to offer up other suggestions for what might happen next.

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Why you cannot coach an ‘Under-performer’

Narayan Kamath

LEADERSHIP GROWTH. GUARANTEED

“I have an under-performer on my team. She is on her way out, but we need to give her one last chance; and I’m supposed to coach her and see if she can turnaround. Problem is, I don’t know where to start..”. Dilip* (name and context changed to maintain confidentiality) is one of a group of high potentials being groomed for more senior roles. He is worried that his inability to turnaround a poor performer might reflect poorly on his own abilities as a leader.

My advice to him – “Don’t”.

The moment we label or categorise someone as an under-performer or non-performer, we have stopped believing in their potential, and their commitment and ability to perform. And if you do not believe in someone’s potential and abilities, there is very little point in you coaching them. So, spare yourself and him the pain and hassle. Leave him in peace.

" Are you saying there is no hope for him?", Dilip asked. “No. No hope at all”.

For coaching to work, the coach must believe that there is hope. By labelling someone as an under-performer or non-performer, we are vocalising our belief – that the person is incapable of change and cannot perform better. This is not a place from where you can coach anyone – at least not with any reasonable chance of success.

Secondly, in this case (and in many similar situations), it is common knowledge within the team that the person is on his/her way out. The support of team-mates and other stakeholders, which is so critical in significant behavioural change, is no longer available to a person who has been written-off.

So, if you are ever asked to coach an under-performer, say No!

However, never shy away from coaching for under-performance!. What’s the difference? When you believe someone has underperformed ( not that he/she is an under-performer), you believe that they are capable of doing better. And that makes all the difference!

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A lazy Employee ,continue to be Lazy and no ONE BATS an Eye
A hard working employee Take it easy for one day and everyone losses their Mind

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????PareshRawal???

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Peace of Mind – It’s Free!

Satish Kakri

It’s difficult to conceive the vastness of the ocean. But it is even more difficult to imagine the vastness of the mind. Sea is often very calm only sometimes it is turbulent. While an ocean is turbulence only at some occasions, the mind is at peace on only sometime. The confusion of the mind primarily arises due to the contradictions experienced in the fast paced life today. There is nothing that we can do for turbulence of the ocean. We can certainly tame our mind to achieve calmness and peace.

In fact peace of mind requires only your focus and consistent reminders to yourself. It has no tangible cost. It’s free

Nature – what it does? When it does? It remains unknown to mankind. Though there is no doubt that extensive study of nature has given us the knowledge and power to predict.

But when we talk of mind it is our choice to train it to be at peace most of the time. We have to understand the difference between peace and bliss. Peace is not bliss but peace offers you an ability to get into state of bliss when you want.

At work place, if you are doing something that you don’t like to do yet you have to do it under compulsion, your mind cannot be at peace. When you are lost in your work and you know that the work is important for you, you are a peace with yourself. Further, if you enjoy your work then every milestone that you achieve will give you bliss. There are the number of Dos and Don’ts which help you to gain peace of mind.

First, let us enumerate the don’ts:

Don’t get too much involved in reading the negative news. Our newspapers and electronic media are full these. You may scan through the headlines to be abreast with what is going on.
Avoid spending too much time with people having negative attitude. Interaction with them will sink their negativity into your subconscious mind.

Regard each person as an individual. They are entitled to hold their opinions. Do not be judgmental. Negative emotions like envy, jealousy, criticism of others will affect your peace of mind. So avoid these.

Past is history. It does not have any significance except the lessons you have learnt. So don’t dwell on your past.
Become friends with members of your family. Children are very intelligent today and they should be treated as friends. Likewise you should be friendly with your spouse.

Your speech controls your relations with others including members of your family. Therefore use your words with care and discretion. The way you say something is as important as what you say.

Don’t be too much attached with your possessions. Practice detachment. What we have today, we may not have tomorrow.
Now about the dos!

Learn to focus your mind. Cut the clutter. On and average there comes as many as fifty thousand thoughts in one day. Try to reduce this number by focusing your mind.

Practice meditation. It will help more than one can imagine.

Cultivate a habit to enjoy only healthy food. Decide that you must eat slightly less than your hunger.

Go on vacation periodically. The cycle of routine work needs to be broken as often as possible.

Give yourself some quality time. Talk to yourself. Talk about what you like about you. And, further improve the same.

Make it your habit to consider that challenges are your opportunities. When you face these challenges with success, it gives you happiness and your mind becomes peaceful.

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Another SEBI law officer quits to start his own law firm

Sumit Agrawal, who worked in the legal department of the Securites and Exchange Board of India (SEBI) for a decade, has quit and plans to start his own law firm. Tuesday was the last day at SEBI for Mr Agrawal.

The 31-year law graduate from National Law University, Jodhpur came into limelight in 2011 when he jointly co-authored a comprehensive book on the SEBI Act dwelling into each provision of the Act and also projected possible future amendments.

When contacted, Mr Agrawal confirmed that he has resigned and is starting his own law firm with a focused practice on regulatory guidelines related to SEBI, Reserve Bank of India (RBI), Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority of India (IRDAI), Competition Commission of India (CCI) and Pension Fund Regulatory and Development Authority (PFRDA) among others.

Interestingly, the former assistant legal advisor only adds to the long list of lawyers who, after a stint with the capital market regulator, went on to become successful lawyers with independent practice or even in the corporate world.

In the past, SEBI law officers such as Sandeep Parekh, R.S. Loona, Dharmishta N. Raval, P.R. Ramesh and Raghavendra Prasad have either formed their own law forms or have joined the corporate world as legal heads or advisors.

While at SEBI, Mr. Agrawal worked with various departments, including surveillance, legal affairs, commodities and litigation. He was part of the team that investigated matters related to the IPO irregularities scam and Satyam.

He also played a role in the amendments to listing norms, insider trading and public issue guidelines.

The recent past also saw the exit of whole time member Prashant Saran whose tenure ended a fortnight ago.

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