Hot Deal

Congrats! You just read it right

329°
Deal Subedar
agarsh

IMG20240511145214


Congrats! You just read it right with your brain so powerful.

Top Comments
Deal Captain Deal Captain
Link Copied

Am I really so much intelligent?

I need a Certificate From amcbrdige to show it to others. Link for that pls.

Deal Lieutenant Deal Lieutenant
Link Copied

first and last letters be at the right place.

Cmabrigde

13 Comments  |  
14 Dimers
  • Sort By
Benevolent Benevolent
Link Copied

Nice plus1🙂 plus1

Tech Guru Tech Guru
Link Copied

Boomer humor

Deal Captain Deal Captain
Link Copied

Am I really so much intelligent?

I need a Certificate From amcbrdige to show it to others. Link for that pls.

Deal Lieutenant Deal Lieutenant
Link Copied

first and last letters be at the right place.

Cmabrigde

View 2 more replies
Deal Captain Deal Captain
Link Copied

The Cambridge fellows only thought that people can read jumbled words with first and last letters in place, forgetting that one should be English literate too, too self centered these guys from cambridge smile

Trailblazer Trailblazer
Link Copied

The school teachers must have to read this so nobody has to remember spellings in future like we had to.

Deal Subedar Deal Subedar
Link Copied

Old school whatsapp forwards on DD?? What is this... information sharing platform or old whatsapp FORWARDS BACK UP sharing platform??????

just for joke 😂

Comrade Comrade
Link Copied

Ha ha ha

Finance Ninja Finance Ninja
Link Copied
If Yuo’re Albe To Raed Tihs, You Might Have Typoglycemia

Ever heard of typoglycemia? Even if you haven’t, chances are you’ll recognize one of the viral puzzles used to demonstrate the phenomenon. Starting around 2003, an email began to circulate claiming that scrambled English words are just as easy to read as the original words.

However, as interesting as the original email was, it didn’t actually tell the whole truth. There’s more to scrambled words than meets the eye.

What is typoglycemia?

That viral email tested our ability to read scrambled words. Here’s what it looks like:

Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn’t mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.

Could you read it? Even with a mistake in this viral email (the letters in rscheearch cannot spell researcher), the truth is that most fluent English speakers can read and understand it.

The word-scrambling phenomenon has a punny name: typoglycemia, playing with typo and glycemia (the condition of having low blood sugar). Typoglycemia can refer to to the phenomenon in which words can be read despite being jumbles, or it can refer to the ability to read such texts. Still, though the word may sometimes be referenced in actual research, it’s not a formal term, nor is it all that commonly used outside the context of such memes.

Is typoglycemia real or a trick?

Does it take you nanoseconds to solve a Word Jumble? No? While your brain can breeze through some word scrambles, it’s more complicated than that viral email suggests.

Matt Davis, a researcher at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit at Cambridge University, helped us sort it out. Here’s what Davis believes the email got right: unless you have a rare brain disorder, people read words as whole units, not letter-by-letter. That’s one of the factors explaining why we can “magically” read the message.

Deal Subedar Deal Subedar
Link Copied

This is like decades old. Why post this now?

Specialist Specialist
Moderator
Link Copied

not a comment just practicing


Tehy are tmielses mastrepciecs

Jsut lkie old fhasoin retnurs atfer smoe tmie

replyuser
Click here to reply
Reply