The Resume Is Dying, and This Is What’s Next

The Resume Is Dying, and This Is What’s Next

Score: 5 Votes: 7

Vote down Reasons

  • Self Promotion : 1
Score: 5 Votes: 7

Vote down Reasons

  • Self Promotion : 1
Score: 5 Votes: 7

Vote down Reasons

  • Self Promotion : 1
Score: 5 Votes: 7

Vote down Reasons

  • Self Promotion : 1
Score: 5 Votes: 7

Vote down Reasons

  • Self Promotion : 1
Draw
Deal Colonel
10
1,179
52036
1044

The Resume Is Dying, and This Is What’s Next

Our online identities have gotten more sophisticated, but the conventions of a job search haven’t kept pace.

BY QUORA

What are viable alternatives to resumes? originally appeared on Quora – the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights.

Answer by Sarah Nahm, CEO of Lever and passionate advocate for diversity in tech, on Quora:

I’ve definitely noticed a lot more grumbling about resumes in the past few years as our online identities have gotten more sophisticated (and interesting!) but the conventions of a job search haven’t kept pace. Some companies are taking action. Here are some interesting experiments or popular alternatives I’ve seen come out of Lever’s customer base:

Keepsafe, a mobile privacy company, declares that it forgoes resumes completely in their application process, asking instead for you to describe something you’ve recently built. They first got the idea after reading Aline Lerner’s shocking post on the low efficacy of resumes.
Speaking of Aline Lerner, she’s recently formed a company to offer an alternative to resumes, Interviewing.io, which offers a fully anonymized technical interview platform as a way to initially screen candidates on their chops alone.
And obviously, platforms like AngelList and LinkedIn offer the ability to apply with your profile, which increasingly includes content you wouldn’t normally find on a resume, like Projects, Posts, and social references. Other, more niche professional communities let you highlight all sorts of industry-specific experience. Behance allows designers to feature their work in rich multimedia as opposed to bullet points. A Coderwall profile lets a developer link their GitHub to feature repos and demonstrate how they’ve unlocked achievements. More and more of these kinds of online professional networks pop up all the time and the best recruiters I know are quite savvy about representing their own companies’ employees on the sites.

This question originally appeared on Quora – the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights.

  • In
112 Comments  |  
7 Dimers
Draw
Deal Colonel
10
1,179
52036
1044

HIRING
4 Interview Questions Smart Leaders Ask to Create Great Culture

Secrets to making the right hires for your company – every time.

BY KATHRYN MINSHEW

@Kmin

Previous experience, key skills, and education. They’re undoubtedly all important things you consider when filtering through applicants in order to make a new hire.

But, what’s another major determining factor of whether or not that hopeful interviewee deserves an offer letter? Cultural fit.

Unfortunately, this important element isn’t quite as cut and dried as those other qualifications—it can’t be quantified in succinct resume bullet points.

Many employers use the, “Would I have a beer with this person?” test, which often leads to unintentional bias.

After all, culture fit goes beyond whether someone will get along with the current team—what’s arguably even more important is whether candidates will thrive within your work environment and embody your core values.

Asking smart questions in your interviews is a surefire way to focus in on whether or not an applicant will be a seamless addition. At The Muse, we like to ask these four:

1. What’s a company (other than this one) that you admire, and why?
It’s all too easy to forget that cultural fit is a two-way street.

Yes, the candidate needs to gel well with your company’s vibe and mission. But, you also need to fit in with her desires, goals, and long-term career vision. It’s not a one-sided relationship.

This is exactly why this question can be so revealing.

Does she love a specific company because it’s known for a flexible approach and laid-back atmosphere? Does he admire an organization because it’s a standout leader in an already crowded space?

This question helps you find out what exactly an applicant values in his or her employer, which is important when you’re searching for a mutually beneficial fit.

2. Under what conditions do you do your very best work?
You don’t hire for mediocrity.

Instead, you bring people onto your team because you know that they’ll make a valuable contribution and turn in amazing work. But, in order to have that expectation, you need to make sure you’re fostering an environment that allows them to do so.

This is another one of those questions that gets down to values and discovers what an applicant needs to truly succeed.

Perhaps she does her best work under pressure, with the constant threat of deadlines hanging over her head. Maybe he needs a little more room to breathe and be creative. Perhaps she likes to keep her head down and do most of her work alone, or maybe she relies heavily on teamwork.

Every single candidate is different. So, asking this question will help you choose the applicants that won’t just survive in your office—but thrive.

3. Can you describe a work environment that you would feel really uncomfortable in?
You now know what makes up an ideal work environment for the applicant you’re interviewing.

But, sometimes finding out what a candidate doesn’t want can be just as revealing.

Asking this question is a great way to get a feel for whether your company is the stuff of this interviewee’s dreams—or his very worst nightmares.

If his answer to this question basically sounds like a biography of your office environment? Well, then you know you haven’t found the right match.

4. Who would you consider the ultimate co-worker from any movie, TV show, or book?

There’s a reason that questions about favorite movies, books, or television shows are such popular icebreakers—one short answer can tell you a lot about someone’s personality.

This question is a sneaky way to get a sense of a candidate’s interests outside of the office, while also taking things one step further and illustrating what sorts of people he or she tends to work well with.

Does she say she’d love to be desk mates with Jim Halpert, because she appreciates the pranks and humor he brings into the office? Or, would he love to work with Leslie Knope, because they share that same ambitious, go-getter spirit?

While it might seem like an off-the-wall question, it can really tell you a lot.

Cultural fit is undeniably important when you’re looking to make a new hire.

But, unfortunately, it isn’t something you can simply scan for on a resume or an application – nor do you want to accidentally bias yourself towards people who will hit it off immediately with your existing employees lest you run the risk of building an overly homogenous team.

Employees don’t need to be best friends, but there does need to be a level of mutual respect and understanding.

Ask these four questions in your interviews, and you’re sure to narrow the field and find the very best fit for your company’s culture.

The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.

ad bot
1
1
1
1
Ad Bot

I found this sponsored content on one of the ad networks.

Draw
Deal Colonel
10
1,179
52036
1044

@sukhichd710 @newdduser
@srocks @ros_guy
@dealyogi @A2Zdeals
@@sweet_pulp2004@@ @Tejaa
@win_edge @prinkle

STRATEGY

How to trick your brain into remembering someone’s name the first time you hear it
Danielle Page, Everup

Your HR manager asks you to show your new coworker the ropes.

You take her through the office kitchen, show her where the good snacks are hidden and point out the lounge area she can use if she wants to get away from her desk.

Then you bring her over to the sales team to introduce her.

But just as you’re about to make the introduction, you realize that you can’t remember her name for the life of you.

It happens to the best of us. Why? Because our brains are hardwired to remember visual details, like what a person’s face looks like, but they aren’t trained to retain arbitrary details-like the name of the new girl or the barista that makes your coffee every single morning.

What’s in a name?

We’re all given a name at random that we are then identified by for the rest of our lives (although your parents would argue that their favorite 80’s singer had a large influence).

But since our names aren’t grounded in any specific information, our brain struggles to retain them. David Badre, an associate professor of cognitive, linguistic and psychological sciences at Brown University, explained the process to Mic. “We don’t arbitrarily stick things in file drawers in our head,” he said. "For someone who really likes baseball, it’s incredibly easy for them to learn new facts about baseball.

Part of that is because you have a big existing knowledge structure, and you can use that to learn new information. But if you’re asked to memorize random things – obscure facts, for example – you don’t have the benefit of knowing all those existing structures. Names are kind of the same thing."

How to trick your brain into remembering
So your brain is not going to miraculously remember your new colleagues name on its own. Here are a few ways to trick it into storing the information in your long-term memory file cabinet.

1. Make eye contact

If you were head down in your work when you met your new co-worker or were too busy giving them the once over to make proper eye contact, you’ve got less of a shot of remembering their name. A study done on eye fixation patterns found that those who remembered names linked with faces spent more time looking into the eyes of the person they were being introduced to.

2. Repeat their name

Our brain has two different types of memory: short-term and long-term. Our short-term memory can only hold so much information, which is often why names get lost in the ether after a brief introduction. Repetition has been proven to help move facts that are stored in our short-term memory over to the more permanent memory in our brains cortex.

When you’re being introduced to someone, say their name out loud, then to yourself, and then out loud again after you’ve concluded your interaction.

3. Use visual associations

Utilize the brain’s knack for remembering visual information by associating the person you’re meeting with a distinct characteristic about them. For example, if you’ve just met your new co-worker Scott, and he’s sporting a man bun, referring to him in your mind as “Scott with the man bun” will tie his arbitrary name with a concrete feature that the brain will remember. (You’re never going to forget “Becky with the good hair” are you?)

Read the original article on Everup. Copyright 2016.

Draw
Deal Colonel
10
1,179
52036
1044

https://i.imgur.com/Crl6aEg.jpg

Draw
Deal Colonel
10
1,179
52036
1044

https://i.imgur.com/jsP9hqv.jpg

Draw
Deal Colonel
10
1,179
52036
1044

https://i.imgur.com/2SORs3q.jpg

Draw
Deal Colonel
10
1,179
52036
1044

Dr. Travis Bradberry

These Types Of People Never Succeed At Work

Experience and knowledge are rapidly losing their relevance to success in the workplace. Harvard economist David Deming studied workplace tasks from 1980 to the present day and found that those that emphasize social skills grew by a whopping 24%, while tasks requiring technical know-how and intelligence experienced little growth. Deming also found that salaries increased the most for jobs that place extra emphasis on social skills.

With the increasing emphasis on social skills, those who lack them stand out like a zebra in a field of horses. We all know the types: the person who won’t stop talking when you’re trying to meet a deadline, the one who blatantly takes credit for your ideas, or the one who callously leaves you to pull an all-nighter to fix their mistake. The list goes on.

There are a lot of otherwise intelligent people out there who can’t stop shooting themselves in the foot. Sadly, their lack of self-awareness and social skills are massive detriments to their careers.

Social skills and self-awareness are matters of emotional intelligence (EQ), and TalentSmart’s research with over a million people has shown that emotional intelligence is responsible for 58% of job performance. Those who lack emotional intelligence are at a significant disadvantage.

“Failure isn’t fatal, but failure to change might be” – John Wooden

There are certain types of people whose lack of emotional intelligence harms their careers more than others. By studying them, you can avoid becoming one of them, and, if your reading experience is anything like my writing experience, you’ll see bits of yourself in some of these profiles. Use that knowledge to build your self-awareness, make adjustments, and grow as a person.

The coward
Fear is an extremely powerful motivator. This is why presidential candidates tell people that their opponent will “destroy the economy” and advertisements warn that “smoking kills.” In the workplace, people overcome by fear resort to irrational and damaging behavior. Cowardly colleagues are quick to blame others and to cover up important mistakes, and they fail to stand up for what is right.

The Dementor

In J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series, Dementors are evil creatures that suck people’s souls out of their bodies, leaving them merely as shells of humans. Whenever a Dementor enters the room, it goes dark and cold and people begin to recall their worst memories. Rowling said that she developed the concept for Dementors based on highly negative people—the kind of people who have the ability to walk into a room and instantly suck the life out of it. Dementors suck the life out of the room by imposing their negativity and pessimism upon everyone they encounter. Their viewpoints are always glass half empty, and they can inject fear and concern into even the most benign situations.

The arrogant
Arrogant people are a waste of your time because they see everything you do as a personal challenge. Arrogance is false confidence, and it always masks major insecurities. A University of Akron study found that arrogance is correlated with a slew of problems in the workplace. Arrogant people tend to be lower performers and more disagreeable and to have more cognitive problems than the average person.

The group-thinker
Group-thinkers choose the path of least resistance and are famous for propagating the “this is how we’ve always done it” mentality. If you find yourself getting brainwashed with what everyone else believes, be careful; the status quo never leads to greatness.

The short-changed
The short-changed are quick to blame their lack of accomplishment on a lack of opportunity. While a lucky break may put a little wind in a successful person’s sails, they got where they are through hard work. What the short-changed don’t realize is that their attitude is what’s short-changing them, not their circumstances.

The temperamental
Some people have absolutely no control over their emotions. They will lash out at you and project their feelings onto you, all the while thinking that you’re the one causing their malaise. Temperamental people perform poorly because their emotions cloud their judgment and their lack of self-control destroys their relationships. Be wary of temperamental people; when push comes to shove they will use you as their emotional toilet.

The victim
Victims are tough to identify because you initially empathize with their problems. But, as time passes, you begin to realize that their “time of need” is all the time. Victims actively push away any personal responsibility by making every speed bump they encounter into an uncrossable mountain. They don’t see tough times as opportunities to learn and grow from; instead, they see them as an out.

The gullible
You can’t help but feel sorry for the gullible type. They’re the ones who find themselves babysitting the boss’s kids the morning after pulling a late night of work . . . on a Sunday! For whatever reason, gullible people (often newbies) go with the flow until the gentle river becomes a tumultuous ocean. It’s okay to negotiate your salary, it’s okay to say no, and it’s okay to question the way things are done. You’ll earn a lot more respect if you stand up for yourself when the time is right.

The apologizer
For every person out there who owes an apology, there’s another who apologizes too often. People who lack confidence are always apologizing for their ideas and actions. They fear failure and believe that apologizing will act as a safety net. Instead, unnecessary apologies cheapen their ideas and make them less likely to stick. It’s important that your tone of voice and body language reflect the importance of your ideas. Stating an idea or opinion as a question is just as bad as apologizing. If you really believe something is worth sharing, then own it and share it with confidence.

Bringing It All Together

None of these behaviors are a career death sentence because they can be eradicated through improved emotional intelligence. All it takes is a little self-awareness and a strong desire to change.

What other types of people belong on this list? Please share in the comments section below, as I learn just as much from you as you do from me.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Dr. Travis Bradberry is the award-winning co-author of the #1 bestselling book, Emotional Intelligence 2.0, and the cofounder of TalentSmart, the world’s leading provider of emotional intelligence tests and training, serving more than 75% of Fortune 500 companies. His bestselling books have been translated into 25 languages and are available in more than 150 countries. Dr. Bradberry has written for, or been covered by, Newsweek, TIME, BusinessWeek, Fortune, Forbes, Fast Company, Inc., USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and The Harvard Business Review.

If you’d like to learn how to increase your emotional intelligence (EQ), consider taking the online Emotional Intelligence Appraisal® test that’s included with the Emotional Intelligence 2.0 book. Your test results will pinpoint which of the book’s 66 emotional intelligence strategies will increase your EQ the most.

Written by

Dr. Travis Bradberry

Draw
Deal Colonel
10
1,179
52036
1044

We hire for IQ and fire for EQ

Vivek Mehrotra

Dean – Flipkart University at Flipkart

What a dichotomy, we hire people for their IQ and fire them for want of EQ, isn’t it true? Look back into your own organizations and ascertain reasons that led to exit of people both voluntarily and those who were asked to leave. Apparently, people especially leaders were handed over the pink slips on the basis of their poor performance, however, if you go deeper you will realize that most of the issues correspond to inappropriate people management rather than inadequate technical knowledge. A senior manager working in finance department of a multinational company once told me, “While I was doing my chartered accountancy, I thought I will encounter complex accounting problems at job, but now at work place I realized most of my problems are related to people”.

Daniel Goleman who carved the term ‘Emotional Quotient’ or ‘EQ’ defines it as a combination of self-awareness, selflessness, self-motivation, empathy, and the ability to love and be loved by people around us. People with high emotional intelligence not only succeed at work but also build thriving, long-lasting, and meaningful relationships. No doubt, intellect is a must for excellent performance and in order to be successful cognitive skills such as thinking about the big picture and having a long-term vision are two essentials that a leader must possess. Nevertheless, leaders who are successful, carry a different set of competencies which distinguish them from the rest. Apart from excelling in key performance areas, they very easily get along with other people; keep themselves and others motivated, persist till they succeed; are able to control their emotions/temptation; stay focused on their own goal, and work together as a team to achieve common goals.

It is true, a person with high IQ and a low EQ i.e. without adequate self-control is like a vehicle having only accelerator but no gears or brakes. Such a vehicle is bound to meet with an accident. People with low EQ find it difficult to maintain good relationships with others and at the same time they are unable to perform well at work. Often it is observed that individual with high IQ become selfish, inconsiderate/insensitive towards other people. This not only restricts them to perform but makes their team members feel disgruntled which ultimately limit their potential.

My neighbour’s son, a fresh pass out from IIT-Kanpur was recruited as a team leader by a multinational IT company. While I was congratulating him he very innocently asked, “Uncle I do not understand why the company has given me this position. You know in my team there are people who have done their master’s degree from IIMs and are even senior to me”? I tried to explain to him that he is lucky as his company appreciates people with high EQ over IQ. But it did not satisfy him. Recently, I met him; he was bubbling with enthusiasm and told me. “Uncle you were right, last month I got promoted and this time I asked the same question to my boss that I asked to you few years back”. He replied, “Apart from technical expertise we look for qualities that help an individual to create a high performing team”.

This raises a question, is EQ an inherent quality like in the case mentioned above or can it be developed like any other competency? The good news is, ‘yes’ it can be developed as any other skill and that too at any stage of one’s career. But the irony is that the premier B-schools of our country which are considered to be the fortress of management education are yet to appreciate this fact. They are failing in their duty to inculcate these vital components in their students that are essential for leadership success. Over a period of time these institutions have become the stronghold of graduate engineers, mostly from IITs. On an average 70% plus students of various IIMs are engineers.

The silver line is that institutions such as XLRI and IIMC have initiated the change in their admission process to bring diversity among their students. According to Vishwa Ballabh, the admissions chairperson of XLRI, "We need versatile students who have equal knowledge of business, economics, politics and social developments so as they may excel in the management field”. Similar sentiments were also expressed by Sanjit Singh, admissions chairperson of IIMC who said, “We seriously think our campus needs students from non-engineering backgrounds. This diversity in student population will add value to classroom exchanges and we will also be able to create managers with diverse skills,”

Hope other institutes will follow their footsteps soon!!!

Draw
Deal Colonel
10
1,179
52036
1044

5 Words That Hiring Managers Want to See on Your Resume
Recruiters spend just 6 seconds reviewing a resume before deciding yes or no. Will your resume make the cut?

A study by job-matching service TheLadders revealed that recruiters spend just 6 seconds reviewing a resume before deciding whether or not a candidate is a good fit for the job they are trying to fill. And what do they look at during those brief 6 seconds? It turns out that 80% of that time—or an even briefer 4.8 seconds—is spent on these particular data points: name, current title/company, previous title/company, previous position start and end dates, current position start and end dates, and education.

Once you make it past the initial cut, then recruiters will dig deeper into your resume, and this is where it is absolutely critical that it include the kind of words that will get their attention and land you an interview. Use the wrong words, and you will look unprofessional—leaving a very bad first impression.

Here are 5 words that will get the attention of hiring managers, and perhaps land you your next job.

1. Created

Companies want employees who are innovative and creative, and who aren’t afraid to take risks and try new things in pursuit of the company’s goals. What have you created at work lately?

2. Achieved

Ultimately, hiring managers want to hire people who are self-motivated and who actually achieve things. Make sure that your work achievements are a prominent part of your resume—the bigger the better.

3. Improved

Every process, system, and product can be improved in some way. Hiring managers are on the lookout for people who are constantly looking for ways to improve their organizations—and the products and services they sell.

4. Resolved

Problem solvers are a great asset to any organization, which is why hiring managers look for job candidates who show in their resumes that they have experience in resolving problems for their organizations.

5. Mentored

While it’s great to hire people who done all the above things, it’s even better when you find someone who does all this and who mentors and teaches others to do these things as well. If you mentor others in your job—and you should—then make sure you get this into your resume.

@Bhaveshdave @srocks

Bad decision good life favim.com 3475531
Deal Captain
16
5
12676
113
@[email protected]_0_0_D wrote:

5 Words That Hiring Managers Want to See on Your Resume
Recruiters spend just 6 seconds reviewing a resume before deciding yes or no. Will your resume make the cut?

A study by job-matching service TheLadders revealed that recruiters spend just 6 seconds reviewing a resume before deciding whether or not a candidate is a good fit for the job they are trying to fill. And what do they look at during those brief 6 seconds? It turns out that 80% of that time—or an even briefer 4.8 seconds—is spent on these particular data points: name, current title/company, previous title/company, previous position start and end dates, current position start and end dates, and education.

Once you make it past the initial cut, then recruiters will dig deeper into your resume, and this is where it is absolutely critical that it include the kind of words that will get their attention and land you an interview. Use the wrong words, and you will look unprofessional—leaving a very bad first impression.

Here are 5 words that will get the attention of hiring managers, and perhaps land you your next job.

1. Created

Companies want employees who are innovative and creative, and who aren’t afraid to take risks and try new things in pursuit of the company’s goals. What have you created at work lately?

2. Achieved

Ultimately, hiring managers want to hire people who are self-motivated and who actually achieve things. Make sure that your work achievements are a prominent part of your resume—the bigger the better.

3. Improved

Every process, system, and product can be improved in some way. Hiring managers are on the lookout for people who are constantly looking for ways to improve their organizations—and the products and services they sell.

4. Resolved

Problem solvers are a great asset to any organization, which is why hiring managers look for job candidates who show in their resumes that they have experience in resolving problems for their organizations.

5. Mentored

While it’s great to hire people who done all the above things, it’s even better when you find someone who does all this and who mentors and teaches others to do these things as well. If you mentor others in your job—and you should—then make sure you get this into your resume.

@Bhaveshdave @srocks


thx you sir https://cdn2.desidime.com/assets/textile-editor/icon_toungueout.gif

Draw
Deal Colonel
10
1,179
52036
1044

I Should Never Have Told My Boss About My Dreams

I feel very upset and frustrated about my work situation. I took a new job almost two years ago and the ‘honeymoon’ lasted a year. The first year on the job was incredible. This past year has been terrible.

When I started the job, I told my husband every day when I came home “This is the job I was looking for!”

I run an internal publications department. The team is great.

My boss is a visionary. She manages six other departments apart from mine. She is a big muckety-muck as they say. She controls a huge part of the organization.

She and I developed a good rapport. My boss gave me a lot of latitude during my first year on the job. For my one-year review she took me out to dinner.

We talked about everything at that dinner. We talked about her career plans, my career plans and our families. It was a very warm and collegial meeting. My boss said she was thrilled to have hired me and was very glad to have me on her team.

Fast forward six months. Now my own performance goals and my team’s goals have been ratcheted up so high that I honestly don’t think anyone in my position could reach them. I’ve had countless meetings with my boss about the problem.

Her basic stance is “Too bad — if you don’t like the job, I’ll find someone else.” She gives lip service to my suggestions for improving our processes but she won’t agree to anything specific. Is she trying to get rid of me? My morale is in the tank.

My manager and I had a heated discussion last week. I’m not sorry we brought our simmering conflict to a head.

I said “I’m trying to reconcile what is going on now, with so much criticism from you and so little support, with our wonderful dinner at my one-year review, when you told me you were thrilled that you hired me.”

I guess she was surprised that I remembered her saying that. She said “I’m not sure I said ‘thrilled.’”

I said “That is good to know and something worth talking about, because if you are not thrilled that I’m here, why am I here? I want to thrill my boss and be thrilled by my job, as well. I assume you want your managers to thrill you, and if I’m not doing that, we should get it out on the table.”

My manager said “I don’t know if you really care about thrilling your boss, do you? You told me at dinner that eventually you want to have your own company — so why should I invest in you?”

I had forgotten that I had told my manager at our pleasant dinner that one day I want to be an entrepreneur.

I have years to do that. I’m not in a rush. Did my disclosure about my long-term career plans turn my boss against me? Was I wrong to tell her that I want to work for myself at some point?

Draw
Deal Colonel
10
1,179
52036
1044

https://i.imgur.com/AzadLiv.jpg

Draw
Deal Colonel
10
1,179
52036
1044

https://i.imgur.com/YOMpPKt.jpg

Draw
Deal Colonel
10
1,179
52036
1044

https://i.imgur.com/K9gS051.jpg

4 Mentalities That Are Killing Your Career
You may be your own worst enemy in your career. Here’s why.

As the economy continues to shift, traditional employment (long-term, full-time) is becoming obsolete. We live in a shared economy. Contract work is on the rise and instead of viewing ourselves as employees who work “for” companies, we now must approach our careers as businesses-on-one who want to partner “with” employers instead.

Job security no longer exists (and that’s not a bad thing)
One of the most important ah-a! moments we can have today is to accept that employment stability no longer exists. Every job is temporary. The sooner we embrace and adapt to this mindset, the better. Unfortunately, many professionals are still working with outdated assumptions. Things like, “My goal is to get a good job with benefits that I can stay at for a long time.” Or, “A college degree will ensure I get better job opportunities.” And even, “If I work hard, keep my head down at work, and just put in the time, they will see my effort and I will be rewarded.” If you believe any of those right now, you’re setting yourself up for a let-down. Today, there are no guarantees when it comes to career advancement.

4 career mentalities you can’t afford to have
A recent survey by LinkedIn of over 10,000 job changers shows that more than 53 percent of them made the change for better career opportunities. While money was important (it ranked second), the need to move to a job that could give them the chance to increase their skills was their primary reason for making the switch. These successful job changers focused on making sure their businesses-of-one stayed employable by keeping their career moving forward. Unfortunately, not every professional will succeed as these job changers did. Why? They have one of four career mentalities that hold them back.

1. Overthinker. The person who thinks about every career option as a scary risk, finding flaws and roadblocks to each one. Such people spend hours, days, weeks, and even years pondering what they should do next. Meanwhile, time marches on in their dead-end jobs. They don’t build any new skills. Eventually, they find themselves part of a “corporate restructuring”—they get a month’s severance and get thrusted into an unexpected job search.

2. One-track-minder. The person who knows exactly what he or she wants to do and has no desire to consider any alternate options. Convinced they’ve got the perfect master plan, they work like crazy, often to the point of exhaustion. Over time, their intensity works against them. Co-workers and managers see them as too rigid and controlling, which often gets them passed over for promotions—and, in some cases, let go for failing to be a good team player.

3. All-talker. The person who loves to talk about his or her career, but never really takes action. Such people are full of ideas and sound very convincing that they’ll be a huge success. They seem to have it all figured out. However, as time passes, you notice they aren’t moving along in their careers. They always have an excuse, and it’s usually someone else’s fault they aren’t where they should be. Eventually, they lose credibility and find people actively try to avoid career conversations with them.

4. Open-roadster. The person who feels fate will guide him or her on the career journey. If they just keep an open mind and let the opportunities present themselves, they believe they’ll find the careers they were meant to have. Over time, they drift from career to career, never really establishing any particular skill or specialty. They claim they’re enjoying the process, but as the years pass, they find themselves with diminishing options and not a lot of money saved for retirement.

Looking back on your career, can you identify with any of these mentalities? If so, it might also explain why you aren’t where you want to be professionally.

If you’re thinking, “That’s not me,” consider this.
Studies by CAREEREALISM show that 88 percent of professionals feel unsatisfied with their career success. While you may not have a severe case of any of the mentalities above, even possessing one of them to a small extent can hurt your ability to move forward.

Ask yourself, “Am I guilty of a career-limiting mentality?” The sooner you recognize what’s holding you back, the sooner you can make changes and take action to eliminate it.

Draw
Deal Colonel
10
1,179
52036
1044

The Interview Secret HR Doesn’t Want You To Know…

J.T. O’Donnell
CEO of CAREEREALISM & CareerHMO |

Having worked in HR for many years before becoming a career coach, I learned a lot about job interviews. Specifically, how hiring managers come to a decision about who to hire. To the job seeker on the outside, you may think it’s a clear-cut process where the most qualified person for the job is selected. Unfortunately, hiring is never clear-cut. Especially, during interviews. Here’s why:

Most Hiring Managers Don’t Know What They Want

When a position becomes available in a company, it’s usually for one of four reasons:

The person currently in the role is getting promoted and a replacement is needed.
The person currently in the role quit and a replacement is needed.
The person currently in the role is being fired and a replacement is needed.
It’s a new position that needs to be filled for the first time.
In all of these cases, hiring managers are forced to come up with a list of candidate criteria they believe are needed to do the job successfully. This is where the problem begins. Why? Hiring managers often don’t know all the criteria needed to the job well. How is that possible? Let me explain…

The Job Search Fine-Tuning Process

While most hiring managers can tell you the tasks associated with a job and the hard skills needed to complete them, they have a much harder time identifying the ‘soft skills’ needed to succeed in the role. For example, it isn’t as easy to explain what type of personality will do best in a position. Nor is it simple to identify the aptitude a person must have to be able to learn in the company’s work environment. As a result, these things are often determined during a series of initial screenings of candidates with the right experience levels. After which, the hiring manager is able to better determine what they are looking for in a candidate. At which point, the information is conveyed to HR, the job description is adjusted, and the search for the candidate continues. Even with special tools, like this Career Decoder Quiz, to help identify the personas needed for a job, it can still stake some time for a hiring manager to fine-tune the job description.

EXAMPLE: Have ever had an initial interview only to be told they’re going with another candidate, BUT you then see the job re-posted a few weeks later? You know what happened. You were a victim of the job description fine-tuning process.

What Can You Do?

The single best way to stay in the running during the job search fine-tuning process is to nail the interview on two levels: personality and aptitude. If you can personally connect with the hiring manager, you can make a strong enough impression to make them want to adjust the job description in your favor. (i.e. This INC magazine article discusses using mimicry to be more likable in interviews.)

Instead of worrying about getting the job you are interviewing for, you should be focused on building a relationship with the hiring manager that can lead to you getting a job with him or her in the near future. The best way to do this is by completing thorough interview prep so you are relaxed yet confident in the interview. The more prepared you are, the easier it is for you to make a good impression.

NOTE: In the event you don’t get chosen, don’t assume you can’t get the job. While I don’t suggest you stalk/harass the employer, you can circle back in a month to check in on their progress in finding a candidate. By then, they have often come full circle with the job description and are re-evaluating previous candidates. Which means, it’s your chance to let them know you’re still interested.

Think of it this way: Hiring managers can sometimes act like ‘window shoppers’ – they’re just looking for now. It’s up to you to be the patient, positive business-of-one who is ready to provide your services once they’ve determined they’re ready to buy.

P.S. – Not sure how to thoroughly prepare for interviews? I invite you to check out the new comprehensive course, “Job Seeker’s Guide To Nailing Every Interview.” When LinkedIn readers use this link, they save over 20%. Work with me personally inside the course and you’ll get all your questions answered so you can nail your next interview!

Draw
Deal Colonel
10
1,179
52036
1044

Here I have 2 £20 notes. The one on the left has been through a shit time, been abused and just a complete mess. The one on the right is straight & crisp, not touched. Answer me this…. is the one on the left worth less than the one on the right???

Moral of the story. Don’t let anyone put you down just because you’ve been through a tough time. We are ALL equal. We are worth the same value. We just have perfect imperfections which make us who we are!

https://i.imgur.com/9ahMrWw.jpg

Draw
Deal Colonel
10
1,179
52036
1044

https://i.imgur.com/lWcwy36.jpg

Draw
Deal Colonel
10
1,179
52036
1044

Best Way to Get a Job Nobody’s Using…

Dear J.T.,

I’ve applied to 100’s of jobs and aren’t getting any responses. I tailor my resume for each one and send a professional cover letter explaining how my skills meet their requirements, but still, I get nothing. What am I doing wrong?
Their mistake? Doing what everyone else is: going through the job search motions, but not really getting in the game. With that many people competing for the same positions using the exact same marketing approach, no wonder the results are dismal. It’s like running on a treadmill but expecting to end up in a different location – when you’re done you’ve gone nowhere and are left exhausted and unfulfilled.

Want A Job? Prove It!

These days, employers expect you to differentiate yourself from the sea of applicants flooding their inbox. They are blurry-eyed and tired of the same old resume and cover letter where you brag about how great you are. It’s just a bunch of “blah, blah, blah” that goes in one ear and out the other.

What If There Was A Better Way?

There is, and just requires you open up and strategically share your passion. Not only does it feel good, it helps you stand out. Check out these two examples:

1) Shaylean is a about to graduate with a MS in Mechanical Engineering. He’s applied to 500 (yes 500!) jobs, gotten 4 interviews, and no job offers. His problem? The ‘spray-and-pray’ method he is using lacks passion for the companies he’s applying to. See here how he was advised to focus on his passion for automobile manufacturing as a way to show his depth of knowledge and high-level of productivity to get him a job. Read Shaylean’s entire story here.

2) Todd wants a job at Dropbox so badly, he built a webpage and a video to show them his abilities and commitment to the position. He poured some major passion into his application as a way to showcase his capacity to work hard and be creative. See Todd’s video and webpage here.

NOTE: There’s A Difference Between “Passion” & “Fanatical”

Sharing your passion for what a company does and why you think they do it better is one thing. Getting crazy or silly just to grab attention is another. The key is to articulate and provide examples that prove you are a member of the employer’s tribe. It’s not enough to say you are a fan, you need to show that you understand how you will add value – enough value to justify the cost of hiring you. So, make sure that passion is demonstrated through actions that will prove to the employer you can do the job… and then some!

Draw
Deal Colonel
10
1,179
52036
1044

https://i.imgur.com/AwPaoll.jpg

Missing