Hot Deal Mistakes Our Brains Make Every Day--And How To Avoid Them

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8 Subconscious Mistakes Our Brains Make Every Day—And How To Avoid Them

The “swimmer’s body illusion,” and other ways our brains play tricks on us.

Mistakes Our Brains Make Every Day—And How To Avoid Them

The “swimmer’s body illusion,” and other ways our brains play tricks on us.

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There is benefit for you in every situation. If, that is, you know how to look for it. The idea behind steady spiritual progress is to see every circumstance and situation (particularly those that challenge you) as a tailor-made lesson in your personal plan for self-development. For example, in a situation where hurtful or angry words were exchanged, why not see it as the chance either to perceive things about your own character which need changing or to rehearse some virtue or quality that you need to put into practice more often? Actually, we should be grateful for the opportunity to evaluate ourselves. In this way you can transform anything into a constructive lesson. Never think that you’ve learned enough and now can stop. You should love it when people try to correct you or give you advice. It keeps you alert and gives you plenty of opportunity to put your truth into practice. It’s a sign of great danger to be unable to accept criticism and instead use your understanding to criticise others. Realise deeply the significance of every moment, and your spiritual progress will be assured.

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Brilliant Puns:

1. A man who wants a pretty nurse, must be patient.

2. A man who leaps off a cliff, jumps to conclusion.

3. A man who runs in front of a car, gets tired;
man who runs behind a car, gets exhausted.

4. War does not determine who is right,
it determines who is left.

5. A man who drives like hell, is bound to get there.

6. A man who stands on the toilet, is high on pot.

And the finest:
7. A lion will not cheat on his wife, but a tiger wood!

@lootboys @vishusgh

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@[email protected]_0_0_D wrote:

h1. Brilliant Puns:



1. A man who wants a pretty nurse, must be patient.

2. A man who leaps off a cliff, jumps to conclusion.

3. A man who runs in front of a car, gets tired;
man who runs behind a car, gets exhausted.

4. War does not determine who is right,
it determines who is left.

5. A man who drives like hell, is bound to get there.

6. A man who stands on the toilet, is high on pot.

And the finest:
7. A lion will not cheat on his wife, but a tiger wood!

@lootboys @vishusgh


After every line my comment was " HYE"
cha gaye guru https://cdn1.desidime.com/assets/textile-editor/icon_biggrin.gif

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@[email protected]_0_0_D wrote:

3. We worry about things we’ve already lost.

No matter how much I pay attention to the sunk-cost fallacy, I still naturally gravitate towards it.

The term sunk cost refers to any cost (not just monetary, but also time and effort) that has been paid already and cannot be recovered. So it’s a payment of time or money that’s gone forever, basically.

The reason we can’t ignore the cost, even though it’s already been paid, is that we wired to feel loss far more strongly than gain. Psychologist Daniel Kahneman explains this in his book, Thinking Fast and Slow:

Organisms that placed more urgency on avoiding threats than they did on maximizing opportunities were more likely to pass on their genes. So over time, the prospect of losses has become a more powerful motivator on your behavior than the promise of gains.

The sunk-cost fallacy plays on our tendency to emphasize loss over gain. This research study is a great example of how it works:

Hal Arkes and Catehrine Blumer created an experiment in 1985 that demonstrated your tendency to go fuzzy when sunk costs come along. They asked subjects to assume they had spent $100 on a ticket for a ski trip in Michigan, but soon after found a better ski trip in Wisconsin for $50 and bought a ticket for this trip, too. They then asked the people in the study to imagine they learned the two trips overlapped and the tickets couldn’t be refunded or resold. Which one do you think they chose, the $100 good vacation, or the $50 great one?

More than half of the people in the study went with the more expensive trip. It may not have promised to be as fun, but the loss seemed greater.

So like the other mistakes I’ve explained in this post, the sunk-cost fallacy leads us to miss or ignore the logical facts presented to us and instead make irrational decisions based on our emotions—without even realizing we’re doing so:

The fallacy prevents you from realizing the best choice is to do whatever promises the better experience in the future, not which one negates the feeling of loss in the past.

Being such a subconscious reaction, it’s hard to avoid this one. Our best bet is to try to separate the current facts we have from anything that happened in the past. For instance, if you buy a movie ticket only to realize the movie is terrible, you could either:

A) stay and watch the movie, to “get your money’s worth” since you’ve already paid for the ticket (sunk-cost fallacy)

or

B) leave the cinema and use that time to do something you’ll actually enjoy.

The thing to remember is this: You can’t get that investment back. It’s gone. Don’t let it cloud your judgment in whatever decision you’re making in this moment—let it remain in the past.


read this before wasting your time in bms https://cdn0.desidime.com/attachments/photos/426587/medium/2761177-10.gif?1481024988https://i.imgur.com/6DUsOLF.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/LdBJH.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/hilarious.gif @DimerAbhi @mahidada @seoplant618
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@vishusgh wrote:

@[email protected]_0_0_D wrote:

3. We worry about things we’ve already lost.

No matter how much I pay attention to the sunk-cost fallacy, I still naturally gravitate towards it.

The term sunk cost refers to any cost (not just monetary, but also time and effort) that has been paid already and cannot be recovered. So it’s a payment of time or money that’s gone forever, basically.

The reason we can’t ignore the cost, even though it’s already been paid, is that we wired to feel loss far more strongly than gain. Psychologist Daniel Kahneman explains this in his book, Thinking Fast and Slow:

Organisms that placed more urgency on avoiding threats than they did on maximizing opportunities were more likely to pass on their genes. So over time, the prospect of losses has become a more powerful motivator on your behavior than the promise of gains.

The sunk-cost fallacy plays on our tendency to emphasize loss over gain. This research study is a great example of how it works:

Hal Arkes and Catehrine Blumer created an experiment in 1985 that demonstrated your tendency to go fuzzy when sunk costs come along. They asked subjects to assume they had spent $100 on a ticket for a ski trip in Michigan, but soon after found a better ski trip in Wisconsin for $50 and bought a ticket for this trip, too. They then asked the people in the study to imagine they learned the two trips overlapped and the tickets couldn’t be refunded or resold. Which one do you think they chose, the $100 good vacation, or the $50 great one?

More than half of the people in the study went with the more expensive trip. It may not have promised to be as fun, but the loss seemed greater.

So like the other mistakes I’ve explained in this post, the sunk-cost fallacy leads us to miss or ignore the logical facts presented to us and instead make irrational decisions based on our emotions—without even realizing we’re doing so:

The fallacy prevents you from realizing the best choice is to do whatever promises the better experience in the future, not which one negates the feeling of loss in the past.

Being such a subconscious reaction, it’s hard to avoid this one. Our best bet is to try to separate the current facts we have from anything that happened in the past. For instance, if you buy a movie ticket only to realize the movie is terrible, you could either:

A) stay and watch the movie, to “get your money’s worth” since you’ve already paid for the ticket (sunk-cost fallacy)

or

B) leave the cinema and use that time to do something you’ll actually enjoy.

The thing to remember is this: You can’t get that investment back. It’s gone. Don’t let it cloud your judgment in whatever decision you’re making in this moment—let it remain in the past.


read this before wasting your time in bms https://cdn0.desidime.com/attachments/photos/426568/medium/2761479-10.gif?1481024976https://i.imgur.com/6DUsOLF.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/LdBJH.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/hilarious.gif @DimerAbhi @mahidada @seoplant618

I am not, didn’t even receive my referral code yet.

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@seoplant618 wrote:

@vishusgh wrote:

@[email protected]_0_0_D wrote:

3. We worry about things we’ve already lost.

No matter how much I pay attention to the sunk-cost fallacy, I still naturally gravitate towards it.

The term sunk cost refers to any cost (not just monetary, but also time and effort) that has been paid already and cannot be recovered. So it’s a payment of time or money that’s gone forever, basically.

The reason we can’t ignore the cost, even though it’s already been paid, is that we wired to feel loss far more strongly than gain. Psychologist Daniel Kahneman explains this in his book, Thinking Fast and Slow:

Organisms that placed more urgency on avoiding threats than they did on maximizing opportunities were more likely to pass on their genes. So over time, the prospect of losses has become a more powerful motivator on your behavior than the promise of gains.

The sunk-cost fallacy plays on our tendency to emphasize loss over gain. This research study is a great example of how it works:

Hal Arkes and Catehrine Blumer created an experiment in 1985 that demonstrated your tendency to go fuzzy when sunk costs come along. They asked subjects to assume they had spent $100 on a ticket for a ski trip in Michigan, but soon after found a better ski trip in Wisconsin for $50 and bought a ticket for this trip, too. They then asked the people in the study to imagine they learned the two trips overlapped and the tickets couldn’t be refunded or resold. Which one do you think they chose, the $100 good vacation, or the $50 great one?

More than half of the people in the study went with the more expensive trip. It may not have promised to be as fun, but the loss seemed greater.

So like the other mistakes I’ve explained in this post, the sunk-cost fallacy leads us to miss or ignore the logical facts presented to us and instead make irrational decisions based on our emotions—without even realizing we’re doing so:

The fallacy prevents you from realizing the best choice is to do whatever promises the better experience in the future, not which one negates the feeling of loss in the past.

Being such a subconscious reaction, it’s hard to avoid this one. Our best bet is to try to separate the current facts we have from anything that happened in the past. For instance, if you buy a movie ticket only to realize the movie is terrible, you could either:

A) stay and watch the movie, to “get your money’s worth” since you’ve already paid for the ticket (sunk-cost fallacy)

or

B) leave the cinema and use that time to do something you’ll actually enjoy.

The thing to remember is this: You can’t get that investment back. It’s gone. Don’t let it cloud your judgment in whatever decision you’re making in this moment—let it remain in the past.


read this before wasting your time in bms https://cdn0.desidime.com/attachments/photos/426608/medium/2762232-10.gif?1481025012https://i.imgur.com/6DUsOLF.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/LdBJH.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/hilarious.gif @DimerAbhi @mahidada @seoplant618

I am not, didn’t even receive my referral code yet.


mine too. not received yet https://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/tmSMO.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/tmSMO.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/tmSMO.gif

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VEDIC WISDOM

What is fear….?

Unacceptance of uncertainty. If we accept that uncertainty, it becomes adventure…! What is envy? Unacceptance of good in others If we accept that good, it becomes inspiration…!

What is Anger?

Unacceptance of things which are beyond our control. If we accept, it becomes tolerance…! What is hatred😬? Unacceptance of person as he is. If we accept person unconditionally, it becomes love…! It’s a matter of acceptance.

Resistance creates stress…

Acceptance does away with stress …! 😀😀


No need to provide counter comments
@DealSeeker @ishandon
@Magus @@[email protected]@

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“I don’t believe in luck. Luck = Leaving things to chance and outside world. I believe in being harbingers of our fate, taking action and creating our own path and destiny in life. Your life is yours to create – Don’t let others do it for you.” – Celestine Chua

“There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.”~ Colin Powell

“The harder I work, the luckier I get.” – Gary Player
“Success is 99% attitude and 1% aptitude.” – Celestine Chua

“It is your attitude, not your aptitude, that determines your altitude.” – Zig Ziglar

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@masthead1
@vishusgh
@asoka
@krishan42933

@sheetalvarunyadav2223
@hese

Many years ago, in a poor Chinese village, there lived a farmer and his son. His only material possession, apart from the land and a small hut, was a horse he had inherited from his father.

One day, the horse ran away, leaving the man with no animal with which to work the land.

His neighbours, who respected him for his honesty and diligence, went to his house to say how much they regretted his loss. He thanked them for their visit, but asked:
“How do you know that what happened was a misfortune in my life?”Someone muttered to a friend: “He obviously doesn’t want to face facts, but let him think what he likes, after all, it’s better than being sad about it.”
And the neighbours went away again, pretending to agree with what he had said.

A week later, the horse returned to its stable, but it was not alone; it brought with it a beautiful mare for company.

The inhabitants of the village were thrilled when they heard the news, for only then did they understand the reply the man had given them, and they went back to the farmer’s house to congratulate him on his good fortune.
“Instead of one horse, you’ve got two. Congratulations!” they said.
“Many thanks for your visit and for your solidarity,” replied the farmer. “But how do you know that what happened was a blessing in my life?”

The neighbours were rather put out and decided that the man must be going mad, and, as they left, they said: “Doesn’t the man realise that the horse is a gift from God?”

A month later, the farmer’s son decided to break the mare in. However, the animal bucked wildly and threw the boy off; the boy fell awkwardly and broke his leg.

The neighbours returned to the farmer’s house, bringing presents for the injured boy. The mayor of the village solemnly presented his condolences to the father, saying how sad they all were about what had occurred.

The man thanked them for their visit and for their kindness, but he asked:
“How do you know that what happened was a misfortune in my life?”
These words left everyone dumbstruck, because they were all quite sure that the son’s accident was a real tragedy. As they left the farmer’s house, they said to each other: “Now he really has gone mad; his only son could be left permanently crippled, and he’s not sure whether the accident was a misfortune or not!”

A few months went by, and Japan declared war on China. The emperor’s emissaries scoured the country for healthy young men to be sent to the front.

When they reached the village, they recruited all the young men, except the farmer’s son, whose leg had not yet mended.

None of the young men came back alive. The son recovered, and the two horses produced foals that were all sold for a good price.
The farmer went to visit his neighbours to console and to help them, since they had always shown him such solidarity.

Whenever any of them complained, the farmer would say: “How do you know that what happened was a misfortune?”

If someone was overjoyed about something, he would ask: “How do you know that what happened was a blessing?”

And the people of the village came to understand that life has other meanings that go beyond mere appearance. It has to be clearly understood that everything happens with the will of God. Its not by chance or by luck, instead it is as per God’s perfect plan even if we do not understand it.

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@sheetalvarunyadav2223 wrote:

@[email protected]_0_0_D how u knw all these post r good to share??? how u knw tht u nt boring us with these? how how .. gd share https://cdn0.desidime.com/attachments/photos/437436/medium/28064363.gif?1481034748


Freshness and interest only guessed,
So its 50-50 chances for like , else
Fill it
Shut it
Forget it

So, mine is
Post it
Tag it
Forget it.!

@asoka

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OP and reader’s do have total control.over post and reading interest.
Their own choice and reason to question (What/Why/) whether take or give.
Wish life could be the same
How wonderful will it be ?
The current scenario is you can spread your own seed’s or end yourself.
Choice is all our’s.

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There are many reasons for that, some people when they make a mistake, they feel bad to the extent that they feel bad about themselves, they start to form bad beliefs about themselves because of they made that mistake, some of them can’t sleep at night, some of them be convinced that he/she is a bad person and some of them lose their self confident, and that’s not a normal thing, it’s dangerous because that’s when mistakes can destroy us.

People feel this way because they link their self worth to whether they make mistakes or not, in other words the fewer mistakes they make, the more worthy they are and visa verse!

And that’s totally madness!! Sure that comes from the way they were treated, for examples when they were children, whenever they make a mistake they get punished and people shout on them, or it may come from a deep belief inside of them that they’re bad or worthless and so they try to appear perfect and superior by making no mistakes at all, there could be more reasons, but I guess you get the point.

Some people have no issue with their self esteem and they don’t consider making a mistake means that they’re less worthy, but even though they feel devastated when they make a mistake, and we can call that guilt.

The guilt feelings can be very intense, and actually that’s a normal and a good thing, because we all make mistakes, it’s a normal thing, and guilt is our mind way to make sure that we won’t be doing this thing again, but when guilt mixes with the feelings of helplessness, that’s a real problem, because we’ll be living a nightmare.

Guilt from one side wants to move us to change the situation, and helplessness form the other side telling us that we can do nothing about it, so guilt alone may move you to action, but guilt with helplessness, that’s a recipe for screwing up yourself.

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Science explains why we are quick to blame others

IANS |

Is your boss quick to blame you when something goes wrong but slow in giving credit for a job well done?

New research from Duke University helps explain why people are biased towards treating negative actions as intentional but positive actions as unintentional.

The researchers found that people use two different mechanisms to judge how intentional an action was.

If the action produced a negative effect, participants were more likely to draw on brain areas involved in processing emotion, in particular, the amygdala.

On the other hand, for positive outcomes people relied less on emotion and more on statistics. That is, they thought about how often people in a particular situation would behave in a similar way.

The team used an example: The CEO knew the plan would harm the environment, but he started the plan solely to increase profits. Did the CEO intentionally harm the environment?

As many as 82 percent responded that the CEO was deliberate.

When the researchers replaced the single word “harm” with “help” in the scenario, however, only 23 percent deemed the CEO’s actions intentional.

“There’s no logical reason why we would call something intentional, just because it causes a bad outcome as opposed to a good outcome,” said corresponding author professor Scott Huettel.

“Intentionality implies purpose on the part of the person, and that should be there for good as much as it is for bad. But it’s not,” Huettel added.

In the example of the CEO who makes a profit and also helps the environment, participants were more likely to say that because CEOs commonly aim to make money; helping the environment was an unintentional side-effect.

The study was published in the journal Scientific Reports.
-—-
@DealSeeker
@srocks
@taujipanipat93

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Men’s brains decline faster than women’s. Here’s why!

108-year-old woman undergoes major brain surgeryDrunk men strip woman at Durga puja pandal’Men in Black IV’ will feature ‘woman in black’What men don’t like to hear from a woman!Tribal woman in Boisar taunted on caste, molested by five upper caste…
An old adage may state, ‘Men age like a fine wine, while women age like a glass of milk,’ but scientists has found that men’s brains age faster than women’s.

Researchers drew their conclusions from scanning the brains of men and women, with an average age of 32. The results showed differences between the sexes in their sub cortical brain structures. Men lose more matter than women in the caudate nucleus and the putamen volume, the part of the brain that deals with movement and emotional processing. The researchers said, “Grey matter volume decreases faster in males than in females emphasising the interplay between ageing and gender on sub cortical structures.”

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Men’s brains decline faster than women’s. Here’s why!

108-year-old woman undergoes major brain surgeryDrunk men strip woman at Durga puja pandal’Men in Black IV’ will feature ‘woman in black’What men don’t like to hear from a woman!Tribal woman in Boisar taunted on caste, molested by five upper caste…
An old adage may state, ‘Men age like a fine wine, while women age like a glass of milk,’ but scientists has found that men’s brains age faster than women’s.

Researchers drew their conclusions from scanning the brains of men and women, with an average age of 32. The results showed differences between the sexes in their sub cortical brain structures. Men lose more matter than women in the caudate nucleus and the putamen volume, the part of the brain that deals with movement and emotional processing. The researchers said, “Grey matter volume decreases faster in males than in females emphasising the interplay between ageing and gender on sub cortical structures.”

Missing