Hot Deal Mistakes Our Brains Make Every Day--And How To Avoid Them

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8 Subconscious Mistakes Our Brains Make Every Day—And How To Avoid Them

The “swimmer’s body illusion,” and other ways our brains play tricks on us.

Mistakes Our Brains Make Every Day—And How To Avoid Them

The “swimmer’s body illusion,” and other ways our brains play tricks on us.

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Put your glasses on to hear better, says a new study

Our vision and hearing are not as reliable as we might think, according to a new study that found human brain is wired to use information from multiple senses to correct other senses.

By: PTI | Los Angeles |

Our vision and hearing are not as reliable as we might think, according to a new study that found human brain is wired to use information from multiple senses to correct other senses.
Researchers at the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA) played brief bursts of sound and triggered flashes of light, in various combinations, and asked participants to identify where they originated.

A total of 384 people, most between the ages of 18 and 22, participated. They typically were asked to identify about 525 stimuli during a 45-minute test.
In the study, subjects were asked to sit facing a black screen, behind which were five loudspeakers. Mounted on the ceiling above was a projector capable of flashing bursts of light onto the screen, at the same spots where the speakers were located.
In general, they fared poorly when the light and sound were played alone. Participants mostly believed that the light sources were closer to the centre of the screen than they actually were, and that noises were coming from closer to the periphery.
The researchers conducted the study in part because there had never been a comprehensive research to examine whether humans’ “spatial localisation” ability u2014 whether we can immediately and accurately perceive where an object is located – is as well-honed as we believe it to be.
“We didn’t expect these spatial errors; they’re very counterintuitive. Spatial localisation is one of the most basic tasks the brain performs, and the brain does it constantly,” said Ladan Shams, a professor at UCLA.
Millions of years of evolution would have perfected spatial localisation in humans, researchers said, but that is not the case.
“Maybe evolution has favoured high precision in the centre of the visual field. We are really good at localising and discriminating at high acuity in the centre of our vision, and that comes with the cost of making more errors at outer area,” Shams said.
The participants answered much more accurately when the flashes and noise were played simultaneously at the same location.
“The brain is wired to use information from multiple senses to correct other senses. The saying is true – ‘If you want to hear better, put your glasses on’,” Shams said.
“Our basic sensory representation of the world u2014 how information from our eyes and ears is processed by neurons in the brain u2014 is inaccurate,” she added.
The study was published in the journal PLOS Computational Biology.


Any relation with speed of light and speed of sound ?
@sinha.vipul
@prinkle @asoka
@Magus @vishusgh

@Troll wants to improve eyesight .

394
57695
1189

Put your glasses on to hear better, says a new study

Our vision and hearing are not as reliable as we might think, according to a new study that found human brain is wired to use information from multiple senses to correct other senses.

By: PTI | Los Angeles |

Our vision and hearing are not as reliable as we might think, according to a new study that found human brain is wired to use information from multiple senses to correct other senses.
Researchers at the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA) played brief bursts of sound and triggered flashes of light, in various combinations, and asked participants to identify where they originated.

A total of 384 people, most between the ages of 18 and 22, participated. They typically were asked to identify about 525 stimuli during a 45-minute test.
In the study, subjects were asked to sit facing a black screen, behind which were five loudspeakers. Mounted on the ceiling above was a projector capable of flashing bursts of light onto the screen, at the same spots where the speakers were located.
In general, they fared poorly when the light and sound were played alone. Participants mostly believed that the light sources were closer to the centre of the screen than they actually were, and that noises were coming from closer to the periphery.
The researchers conducted the study in part because there had never been a comprehensive research to examine whether humans’ “spatial localisation” ability u2014 whether we can immediately and accurately perceive where an object is located – is as well-honed as we believe it to be.
“We didn’t expect these spatial errors; they’re very counterintuitive. Spatial localisation is one of the most basic tasks the brain performs, and the brain does it constantly,” said Ladan Shams, a professor at UCLA.
Millions of years of evolution would have perfected spatial localisation in humans, researchers said, but that is not the case.
“Maybe evolution has favoured high precision in the centre of the visual field. We are really good at localising and discriminating at high acuity in the centre of our vision, and that comes with the cost of making more errors at outer area,” Shams said.
The participants answered much more accurately when the flashes and noise were played simultaneously at the same location.
“The brain is wired to use information from multiple senses to correct other senses. The saying is true – ‘If you want to hear better, put your glasses on’,” Shams said.
“Our basic sensory representation of the world u2014 how information from our eyes and ears is processed by neurons in the brain u2014 is inaccurate,” she added.
The study was published in the journal PLOS Computational Biology.


Any relation with speed of light and speed of sound ?
@sinha.vipul
@prinkle @asoka
@Magus @vishusgh

@Troll wants to improve eyesight .

394
57695
1189

Put your glasses on to hear better, says a new study

Our vision and hearing are not as reliable as we might think, according to a new study that found human brain is wired to use information from multiple senses to correct other senses.

By: PTI | Los Angeles |

Our vision and hearing are not as reliable as we might think, according to a new study that found human brain is wired to use information from multiple senses to correct other senses.
Researchers at the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA) played brief bursts of sound and triggered flashes of light, in various combinations, and asked participants to identify where they originated.

A total of 384 people, most between the ages of 18 and 22, participated. They typically were asked to identify about 525 stimuli during a 45-minute test.
In the study, subjects were asked to sit facing a black screen, behind which were five loudspeakers. Mounted on the ceiling above was a projector capable of flashing bursts of light onto the screen, at the same spots where the speakers were located.
In general, they fared poorly when the light and sound were played alone. Participants mostly believed that the light sources were closer to the centre of the screen than they actually were, and that noises were coming from closer to the periphery.
The researchers conducted the study in part because there had never been a comprehensive research to examine whether humans’ “spatial localisation” ability u2014 whether we can immediately and accurately perceive where an object is located – is as well-honed as we believe it to be.
“We didn’t expect these spatial errors; they’re very counterintuitive. Spatial localisation is one of the most basic tasks the brain performs, and the brain does it constantly,” said Ladan Shams, a professor at UCLA.
Millions of years of evolution would have perfected spatial localisation in humans, researchers said, but that is not the case.
“Maybe evolution has favoured high precision in the centre of the visual field. We are really good at localising and discriminating at high acuity in the centre of our vision, and that comes with the cost of making more errors at outer area,” Shams said.
The participants answered much more accurately when the flashes and noise were played simultaneously at the same location.
“The brain is wired to use information from multiple senses to correct other senses. The saying is true – ‘If you want to hear better, put your glasses on’,” Shams said.
“Our basic sensory representation of the world u2014 how information from our eyes and ears is processed by neurons in the brain u2014 is inaccurate,” she added.
The study was published in the journal PLOS Computational Biology.


Any relation with speed of light and speed of sound ?
@sinha.vipul
@prinkle @asoka
@Magus @vishusgh

@Troll wants to improve eyesight .

190
6367
64
@[email protected]_0_0_D wrote:

Put your glasses on to hear better, says a new study

Our vision and hearing are not as reliable as we might think, according to a new study that found human brain is wired to use information from multiple senses to correct other senses.

By: PTI | Los Angeles |


Our vision and hearing are not as reliable as we might think, according to a new study that found human brain is wired to use information from multiple senses to correct other senses.
Researchers at the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA) played brief bursts of sound and triggered flashes of light, in various combinations, and asked participants to identify where they originated.

A total of 384 people, most between the ages of 18 and 22, participated. They typically were asked to identify about 525 stimuli during a 45-minute test.
In the study, subjects were asked to sit facing a black screen, behind which were five loudspeakers. Mounted on the ceiling above was a projector capable of flashing bursts of light onto the screen, at the same spots where the speakers were located.
In general, they fared poorly when the light and sound were played alone. Participants mostly believed that the light sources were closer to the centre of the screen than they actually were, and that noises were coming from closer to the periphery.
The researchers conducted the study in part because there had never been a comprehensive research to examine whether humans’ “spatial localisation” ability u2014 whether we can immediately and accurately perceive where an object is located – is as well-honed as we believe it to be.
“We didn’t expect these spatial errors; they’re very counterintuitive. Spatial localisation is one of the most basic tasks the brain performs, and the brain does it constantly,” said Ladan Shams, a professor at UCLA.
Millions of years of evolution would have perfected spatial localisation in humans, researchers said, but that is not the case.
“Maybe evolution has favoured high precision in the centre of the visual field. We are really good at localising and discriminating at high acuity in the centre of our vision, and that comes with the cost of making more errors at outer area,” Shams said.
The participants answered much more accurately when the flashes and noise were played simultaneously at the same location.
“The brain is wired to use information from multiple senses to correct other senses. The saying is true – ‘If you want to hear better, put your glasses on’,” Shams said.
“Our basic sensory representation of the world u2014 how information from our eyes and ears is processed by neurons in the brain u2014 is inaccurate,” she added.
The study was published in the journal PLOS Computational Biology.




-——-
Any relation with speed of light and speed of sound ?
@sinha.vipul
@prinkle @asoka
@Magus @vishusgh


@Troll wants to improve eyesight .


https://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/e74r3.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/e74r3.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/e74r3.gif to 3 baar likhne ki kya jarrorat thi https://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/2SAw1.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/2SAw1.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/SXqKN.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/SXqKN.gif
https://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/t2Jn8.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/t2Jn8.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/t2Jn8.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/ILVtb.gifhttps://i.imgur.com/y9rXrkt.gifhttps://i.imgur.com/y9rXrkt.gifhttps://i.imgur.com/y9rXrkt.gifhttps://i.imgur.com/y9rXrkt.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/3obab.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/3obab.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/3obab.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/3obab.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/3obab.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/3obab.gif

3 times written – light speed 3 * 10^8
very bad logic https://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/knuppel.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/knuppel.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/knuppel.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/knuppel.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/knuppel.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/knuppel.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/3obab.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/3obab.gifhttps://cdn0.desidime.com/smileys/3obab.gif

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@vishusgh
Speed of light is very high than the speed of sound
Do query Google or quora !
Why the spark in cloud seen first before hearing the roaring sound ?

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@[email protected]_0_0_D wrote:

@vishusgh
Speed of light is very high than the speed of sound
Do query Google or quora !
Why the spark in cloud seen first before hearing the roaring sound ?


even non leaving things knows this https://cdn2.desidime.com/assets/textile-editor/icon_evil.gif
Speed of light : 3*10^8 m/s

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6 Mistakes That Can Slow Your Metabolism

How not to sabotage your own efforts to keep your body lean.

The Mistake—You take your coffee decaf.

Why That’s a Problem—You’re missing out in a simple (and delicious) way to temporarily increase your metabolic burn. “Caffeine stimulates your central nervous system,” explains Marisa Moore, RD, in private practice in Atlanta and a past spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “It’s estimated that drinking caffeinated coffee can increase your metabolism by about 15 percent for up to 3 hours.” Add that to the ever-expanding tally of java’s health benefits: lowered risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cognitive decline and, most recently, a decreased risk of premature death.

The Fix—As long as caffeine doesn’t leave you a jittery mess, try making the switch.

The Mistake—You eat breakfast…but it’s typically oatmeal or a bagel.

Why That’s a Problem— You’re doing the right thing by eating in the morning, as regularly scheduled meals keep your metabolism humming along, but a little protein would go a long way toward helping the cause. It takes more energy to digest than carbohydrates, and it promotes muscle mass.

The Fix— Add 20 grams of protein at breakfast, recommends Jessica Crandall, RD, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, roughly the amount in one container of plain low-fat Greek yogurt.

The Mistake—You rely on your trusty fitness tracker to keep tabs on your strength training.

Why That’s a Problem—You know the more lean muscle you have, the more energy your body uses at rest, and that using weights is an efficient way to build that muscle. Recent research from Iowa State University reports that fitness trackers aren’t so great at measuring strength training, though—the four popular models tested were all off on their energy expenditure estimates by at least 25 percent when it came to resistance work. That means you may end up with an inflated sense of how hard you’re pushing yourself in the weight room.

The Fix—Listen to your body instead. A good guideline: For any given set of any given exercise, you should feel like you could do 2 more reps when you stop. So if you’re doing 12 reps of bicep curls, you’ll know you’re using the correct weight if you feel like you could make it to 14 reps but not more than that.

The Mistake—You don’t feel hungry after you exercise, so you don’t eat.

Why That’s a Problem— Workouts deplete muscle stores, and eating the right mix of nutrients within an hour after you finish helps them recover, which is essential for increasing lean muscle mass.

The Fix— Crandall recommends refueling with a snack made up of 10 to 15 grams of protein and 15 grams of carbs.

The Mistake—You get up at the same time every day, but you throw caution to the wind during the weekend.

Why That’s a Problem—Yes, we’re talking about sleep hygiene, and we know you’ve heard it a million (and one) times, but there’s new reason to get on board. Just one night of sleep loss can throw off the circadian rhythms of genes that help keep your metabolism moving at a quick pace, according to a recent small study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

The Fix—Make bedtime the same across the board, or at least try to get close to that goal.

The Mistake—It’s often mid-afternoon by the time you realize you haven’t had much water.

Why That’s a Problem—Your metabolism is the sum of all the processes in your body that use energy—digestion, muscle contraction, elimination of bodily waste, etc. Guess what? Hydration plays a big role in most, if not all, of them, says Moore. If you’re dehydrated, those systems can slow down or start working at less than optimal levels, which could in turn slow down your metabolism.

The Fix—Urine should stay a light yellow color, and whatever trick gets you to drink more H2O is the one you should use. Two simple but effective ones: set periodic alarms on your phone to get up and head to the faucet or keep a reusable bottle on your desk as a visual reminder to keep drinking.

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